Infinite – “The Eye” Review

(Music Video) / (Live Performance)

Infinite – The Eye

Reviewed
on October 5, 2016

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This explanation is very much lacking as arguably all pop songs follow this form in one way or another, but the distinction I wish to draw on is that “The Eye” is predominantly interested in the hyping—the “building up”—aspect of the song’s progression. Is that a benefit or detriment? In this review, I argue it is both and hence why many might be flustered over whether “The Eye” is a solid release or not.

Personal Message:
It has been, as of this sentence,
nine or so days since the last review. Furthermore, it is already a new month:
October. Due to the many essays I have been writing, reviews have sadly become
delayed. Nonetheless, I hope readers understand and to that I would like to
thank readers for being patient. For other news, as some might have noticed,
the links have been revised so that they are less redundant; rather than
listing each link on its own separate line and repeating the artist and song
name, it is now simply “(Music Video) / (Dance Practice)” or whatever is
appropriate. Nothing significant, but these minor changes towards helping
improving the blog in any form—content and aesthetics—are always welcomed.  

On topic with Infinite and their
recent comeback, while I do not review choreographies anymore (and rightfully
so; I lack the analytical skills for such), I strongly recommend readers to
watch the linked live performance (or if in the far future, then the dance
practice). Infinite is very much recognized for their dancing and “The Eye” is
no exception. I would even go as far as claiming this is their best
choreography as of yet. Of course, though, for our purposes, let us focus on
the song itself. From my knowledge, current views of “The Eye” are a mix: some
fans greatly praise the song; some fans find it mediocre but that it contains
Infinite’s signature sound; and some fans find the song to lean moreover the
weaker side and is not “Infinite-like.” In other words, there is currently no
main take to the song. In terms of where I will argue where the song stands, I
actually believe that the current mixtures of opinions are rather accurate:
“The Eye” is a convoluted song in the sense that it contains many impressive
points, and yet, it is still lacking at other points. Let us now dive right
into the eye of the song.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 6/10
(6.00/10 raw score) – “Slightly above average”


Vocals: 7/10


Sections: 5/10
(5.17/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Conclusion
(Post-Chorus)

1.     Introduction:
4/10

2.     Verse: 6/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 6/10

4.     Chorus: 6/10

5.     Post-Chorus: 5/10

6.     Conclusion (Post-Chorus): 4/10


Instrumental: 6/10


Lyrics: 6/10

[Instrumental]

It’s all over, I forgot it all
Finally, I’ve erased you
It was so long, it was so hard
But I’m saying goodbye to this break up
It has all ended, it has all stopped
Finally, light is coming down
The stormy rain and wind
Has finally stopped but

Your memories
Wrap around me again
Even when I take one step
I get drenched with you
The place I left you
The place I ran away from
It’s the center of my memories of you
I finally realize

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
The fate that has remained with me
I try to escape from you
I try to run far away
But I’m swept up by you again

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
These feelings that I still have
I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you
With eyes filled with sin
I’m trapped in your eyes
Trapped

You were so beautiful
We were so happy
In your memories
In the light of the memories
I think I could live

But I don’t think I can do this again
I don’t think I can pierce through you and leave
In your photo
I’m reflected in those eyes
I still can’t do anything
So I’m crying

Your eyes, your face
They sweep me up again
You fall as rain that are like prison bars
Closing up my heart

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
The fate that has remained with me
I try to escape from you
I try to run far away
But I’m swept up by you again

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
These feelings that I still have
I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you
With eyes filled with sin
I’m trapped in your eyes
Trapped

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: To
note, this will most likely be a faster review given how busy I am (and that
there are many songs to catch up on). If possible, I will finish this review in
two paragraphs at most.

Onto
the review, “The Eye” holds at a six which is still a decent score. That said,
though, in comparison to past releases such as the much older ones of “Last
Romeo” and “The Chaser” (which I have reviewed), it is slightly weaker if we
judge from a numerical context. For what we will be focusing on in specific, I
believe the reason for “The Eye” ‘s mixture of opinions would be in how its
main strength is actually its  main
weakness: the structuring of the song—in other words, how the song’s
progression is formed.

Clarifying
what I mean with the term “progression,” I am referring to how the song
essentially flows. In a very rudimentary explanation of “The Eye” ‘s
progression—again, realize there is much
more involved, and of which I hope to cover later—the song heavily focuses on
building up to the climaxes—in this case, the choruses—and from there, it
repeats this cycle. This explanation is very much lacking as arguably all pop
songs follow this form in one way or another, but the distinction I wish to
draw on is that “The Eye” is predominantly interested in the hyping—the “building up”—aspect of the
song’s progression. Is that a benefit or detriment? In this review, I argue it
is both and hence why many might be flustered over whether “The Eye” is a solid
release or not. With all this hopefully clarified and in mind, let us look into
the effects of this emphasized “hyping.”

Focusing
first on the vocals, the hyping-orientated take very much strengthens the
vocals—or more accurately, it diversifies
the vocals. Consider the vocals in an overarching view: from the very
beginning, Infinite’s slower, passive, and lower singing is showcased. However,
“The Eye” begins to pick up much quickly from here and soon, the vocals
progress to a much hastier pacing and likewise notes begin to equally escalate
along with intensity. Eventually, the climaxes occur—which, as said, are the
choruses—and from here a more direct, powerful approach is taken with Infinite’s
vocals. In summary, then, because “The Eye” is structured in a form that cares
less of the end—the climactic choruses—and more on the path to getting there,
listeners are exposed a multitude of vocal styles, intensities, pacing, and so
forth. As a result, the vocals become appealing due to that variety. On top of
that all, though, is that the actual execution holds well. It is more than just
variety at play; the men excellently cover the transitioning points, are
tuneful and harmonious among one another, and appropriately match their vocals
to the song’s state (hyping, climax, etc.). Adding to this, the instrumental
follows a similar route and many of the mentioned points would equally apply to
it.

The
downside to this all, however, is the emphasis towards hyping creates problems
for the sections—but understandably so. Right from the start, listeners might
notice the introduction is potentially dragged; it appears excessive in length
and yet does not necessarily establish the song’s overall tone and style. Even
if the song’s emotional tone is established—a solemn tone—on a musical sense,
one cannot foresee if the song would take the form of a ballad or an upbeat pop
song. Regardless, the main critique to point to is the length; the
establishment of tone and so forth is not as significant as the introduction itself
taking extra seconds despite already setting up the song (and again, of which I
argue is not precise). Other moments for where the emphasized hyping is
problematic would be towards the post-choruses and the conclusion. The
post-choruses in “The Eye” are meant for recycling the song’s progression so
that it can begin anew with a slower, calmer start, but unfortunately the post-choruses
fulfilled that role somewhat poorly. In some aspects, the post-choruses
actually increase the intensity versus just gradually decreasing it—this being
a contradicting flow if considering how “The Eye” needs a proper resetting for
its specific hyping style to work. Nonetheless, given the quick and sharp ends
to them, they are still functional; the issue, then, is that they are not
necessarily efficient at their roles.

“The
Eye” is overall still an impressive song, however. It may reach an impressive,
superb standard, but it nevertheless holds decently. Certainly, the men’s
vocals continue to shine due to the song’s focus on hyping and that, while some
issues occurred with that very focus, I personally appreciate the song’s unique
decision of that. It has been a while since I last heard a song where the
building-up—the hyping—is more focused than on its climactic points. This is
also why the producer(s)’ decision to not include a bridge is wonderful: a
bridge would not have fit the song and would have very much counteracted the
song’s main emphasis. All in all,  “The
Eye” may not be Infinite’s strongest song, but it may be one of Infinite’s more
unique ones and absolutely the dancing involved—even if not musical per se—is
the song’s best asset.

_______________________________________________________

Again,
I apologize to readers for not posting content for a while. On the positive
side, I will have a break soon and plan to catch up during that. As said,
though, university comes first but know that, even if not writing, I am
constantly doing the analytical work of reviews ahead of time. And that I have
recently been binge-watching Apink and now have a huge idol crush on Eunji who
is also very much my “ideal type” along with SPICA’s Boa but this is all irrelevant news. Imagine the last sentence being
said in an accelerated way. Jokes aside, I will work on reviewing Hyuna’s “How’s
This?” soon and with that to finally have a social discussion (it has been months
since the last if correct), and from there to then review Crayon Pop’s “Doo
Doom Chit.”

Until
then, “I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you.” Look forward to whichever review
comes first.