DIA – “Mr. Potter” Review

DIA – Mr. Potter (Music Video)

DIA – Mr. Potter

Reviewed
on September 17, 2016

There are no changes that occur be
it in tune or pacing, and as a result of such the instrumental, contrary to the
magical sound it possesses, is an instrumental that becomes easily overlooked
as mere background. In other words, the instrumental merely fulfills the concept of an instrumental; it exists because
in a sense it has to exist. Couple
that idea with also how it horrendously pairs with the vocals to further accentuate
its mundane sound and the result is what is seen: a two for a rating.    

Personal Message:
With my rather erratic schedule of
reviewing songs, although this review was to be after Red Velvet’s “Russian Roulette,” I have decided that despite “Russian
Roulette” ‘s review being almost finished, I will instead begin a whole new
review. Why the abrupt change? To use a cliché term, I found myself extremely “rusty”
with reviewing songs and given the new format I will be following (and of which
is discussed in Red Velvet’s review; in short, I plan to discuss only relevant
points I find), I needed a song that would be more easily dissected. With Red
Velvet’s “Russian Roulette,” although I do have a general sense of where I wish
to guide the review, I unfortunately cannot articulate it and thus, am taking a
break on it. On the other hand, the ladies of DIA and their latest comeback
prove to be a solution: “Mr. Potter” is a song that I can more easily
articulate and deconstruct. But, that said, this is a review DIA fans may not
necessarily welcome.

Explaining what I mean by that, in very
blunt terms: “Mr. Potter” scores poorly. Given fans’ loyal support to artists, a
lower rating for songs tend to be received negatively; after all, should fans
not stand by their artists? Of course, though, as discussed in past reviews
such as in Oh
My Girl’s “Windy Day” review
—of which also scored poorly—it is not about
the ratings that matter but instead the discussions that occur. Why do I score a song as is? Why do fans disagree or agree? Those
questions and the answers to them are what matters; what the scores are end up being irrelevant in the end. And
thankfully, with the linked review, I am glad that readers engaged on a more
critical, deeper level and that is what I hope—and expect—will occur in this
review.

With all of that covered, let us now
focus on DIA’s “Mr. Potter.” From my personal knowledge of DIA as I have followed
a few of their comebacks and even attendance on Weekly Idol (and to that, Eunjin, their main dancer, awes me), I
expected “Mr. Potter” to perhaps be a significant improvement over, for
example, “On the Road” (their prior release). Most of their songs, from again
my personal take, have been average and thus, I predicted that “Mr. Potter”
would be the song that would push DIA
to a higher level. Unfortunately, their latest comeback is a magic show gone
wrong: “Mr. Potter” is by far DIA’s weaker if not weakest song.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 3/10
(3.00/10 raw score) – “Below average”


Vocals: 2/10


Sections: 3/10
(2.71/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Rap, Chorus, Conclusion

1.     Introduction:
2/10

2.     Verse: 2/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 3/10

4.     Chorus: 2/10

5.     Bridge: 3/10

6.     Rap: 3/10

7.     Conclusion: 4/10


Instrumental: 2/10


Lyrics: 5/10

Accio Mr. Potter, in front of my eyes
A sweet forest called you, I’ve fallen into it
I can’t get out because of this instinctual pull
I wanna wanna wanna
Wanna get your mind
Descendo, will you show me your honest heart?
I try to escape but I can’t, so ridiculous
I’m addicted to your sweet magic
Lalala don’t wanna confess

Don’t hide and show me, boy
Light on me, lumos
So my heart can touch yours, go

That’s right, I got a feeling today
I can’t hide it anymore, no
Only look at me, I’m casting a spell on you
That’s right, you felt my heart
I can’t let go of you, I don’t want to let you go
Your charms cast a spell on me so only I will know

Where are you looking? Focus on me
Don’t look anywhere else, impervious
Only I am chosen to go to this sweet forest
To me, to me, to me
To me come closer, boy
I can’t get out because of this instinctual pull
I wanna wanna wanna
Wanna get your mind
I’m addicted to your sweet magic
Lalala don’t wanna confess

Don’t hide and show me, boy
Light on me, lumos
So my heart can touch yours, go

That’s right, I got a feeling today
I can’t hide it anymore, no
Only look at me, I’m casting a spell on you
That’s right, you felt my heart
I can’t let go of you, I don’t want to let you go
Your charms cast a spell on me so only I will know

Give me give me give me
Give me your love
Give me give me give me
Give me your love
I’ve fallen for your charms, I can’t escape
Cast a spell on me so only I will know
You, for you I want to hold you in my heart
Come closer to me, so I can feel you
I can’t let you go now, I like you

Past the deep forest, I discovered a sweet ocean
Like hail, you flew into my heart like sweet magic
This is a rational degree, sucked into this black hole
This is your spell, I’ve fallen into it, ‘holic

That’s right, I got a feeling today
(Oh, Mr. Potter)
I can’t hide it anymore, no
Only look at me, I’m casting a spell on you
(I’m casting a spell on you)
That’s right, you felt my heart
I can’t let go of you, I don’t want to let you go
Your charms cast a spell on me so only I will know

Give me give me give me
Give me your love
Give me give me give me
Give me your love
I’ve fallen for your charms, I can’t escape
Cast a spell on me so only I will know

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: For
what my argument will be in this review, I assert that the main, overarching issue
with “Mr. Potter” is overall its lack of complexity. “Mr. Potter” is unrefined
in its sounds and lacks creative composition in terms of its structuring. It is
a song that appears to have been rushed in production and hardly given effort
in terms of adding unique, creative features outside of stylistic points.

For
example, when it comes to the instrumental, it showcases twinkling, lighter toned
sounds. Certainly this creates the stylistic
tone of the song and is indeed creative; I cannot recall another song that uses
fantasy, magical-like sounds, after all. However, as said, this is only stylistically
creative and provides minimal benefits to the actual song’s sonic appeal and
this separation may be what many fail to observe. Ignoring the atmosphere the
instrumental establishes, if we focus purely on its sound, we come to realize
it lacks in variety. The electronic twinkling provides little more than a
repetitive and at times even vexing noise. There are no changes that occur be
it in tune or pacing, and as a result of such the instrumental, contrary to the
magical sound it possesses, is an instrumental that becomes easily overlooked
as mere background. In other words, the instrumental merely fulfills the concept of an instrumental; it exists because
in a sense it has to exist. If it
were more dynamic in any aspect—pacing, flow, tune, and so forth—then it would
be distinguishable. As is, though, with minimal changes around, it is difficult
to heed attention to. Think of a ticking clock: sure it exists, but soon
enough, the sound becomes irrelevant and blocked out. Sadly, that analogy
applies to “Mr. Potter” ‘s instrumental. Coincidentally, the vocals also follow
a very similar trend and hence why it also earned a two.

In
terms of the sections, many have also scored poorly. The main reason behind
this is the result of meshing the vocals and instrumental: repetitiveness on
top of repetitiveness. Both categories—vocals and instrumental—are already
mundane in of themselves, but now with gauging them as a working unit via the
sections, the outcome is horrendous. Yes, both the vocals and instrumental are
fitting one another due to their lack of variety, but unlike other instances
where synergy is desired, in “Mr. Potter” this specific synergy leads to an
even greater amount of staleness. Vocals are unchanging and likewise the
instrumental is unchanging; this means that the entirety of the song—the entirety­—remains a stagnant clump.
Furthermore, even on a more individualized analysis of the sections, each also
fares poorly. Take the introduction for example. Believe it or not, but the
music video’s introduction is not for the sake of the music video; indeed,
after watching a few live performances (none are linked as none are official
uploads from music broadcasts), the introduction is truly an excessive length
and additionally fails to truly establish the song’s style. With other sections
such as the choruses, verses, and the like, many are structured in a simplistic,
linear form. Alone that is not problematic, but with how the vocals and
instrumental are already too plain, the sections’ structure do not mediate that
problem but rather adds onto it.

It
truly is disappointing that the only redeeming factor is the lyrics—and even so
it is merely average. Although the following is difficult to say and even
unwarranted, “Mr. Potter” is one of the weakest songs I personally have yet to
hear. It lacks in sounding sharp, diverse, and is ultimately one of the most generic,
stale songs I have heard. Now, is this all to mean that DIA is terrible and
bereft of skills and should not be supported? Absolutely not. “Mr. Potter” is
merely one song out of the many DIA has released so far, and as always, songs
are not necessarily representative of a group’s skills. Nevertheless, for how
this song individually stands, it is a lackluster one. In the future, I expect
a stronger comeback from the ladies. And of course, fans should very much
continue to support DIA. After all, it is through fans that groups continue to
release new songs. All in all, though, DIA’s “Mr. Potter” is a magic trick gone
wrong: nothing impresses the audience.

_______________________________________________________

I
am uncertain on whether this review brings justice to both DIA and my idea of
further condensing reviews. More practice, as usual, will be required. Optimistically, though, I am glad that the review is moreover two paragraphs than of the usual–this being a sign that my new format is taking place. Regardless,
I do hope readers find this review engaging and that readers are equally
critical of my critique towards “Mr. Potter.” And as usual, thank you to all
for reading or skimming.

Red
Velvet’s “Russian Roulette” is the next upcoming song review, and depending on
how dedicated I am it might even be released today. If not today, then expect
it to be released in a few more days. Afterwards, I will be reviewing 2PM’s “Promise”
especially as male artists have not received much spotlight as of the late. In
fact, VIXX’s “Fantasy” is another male group I have in mind to review.
Hopefully more concise reviews will allow them to all be reviewed by this
month. Until then, “I can’t let go of you, I don’t want to let you go.” Look
forward to Red Velvet’s comeback review.