VARSITY – “U R My Only One” Review

(Music
Video)
/ (Dance
Practice)

VARSITY – U R My Only One

Reviewed
on May 11, 2017

Admittedly,
while for a debut song “URMOO” is definitely impressive especially as—unsurprisingly—debut
songs tend to be artists’ weaker songs given that artists are still
significantly learning and improving (and are not prepared to perhaps handle
more complex song compositions), “URMOO” in a general sense is rather average. Certainly
the song has its strength in terms of the men’s vocals and also in how the
composition cleverly handles the song’s flow and intensity, but ultimately the
sonic aspect to the song is far too basic. That shortcoming is what greatly
limits the potential to “URMOO.”

Personal Message:
As stated in the prior
post
—one that focused on musical technicalities via challenging assumptions
about “MR Removed” videos—I am now on summer break. This means I will have
plenty of free time to catch up on reviews and particularly for this summer, I
truly wish to hone my writing skills in the sense of writing more efficiently.
(And for a fun side note, I am also honing my driving skills and hope to
acquire my license soon.) After all, some readers might have noticed that overtime,
reviews on this blog are slowly becoming shorter in length while, I hope, still
maintaining worthwhile content. One my writing weaknesses is that I simply
write unnecessary, excess details and thus, I will spend this summer break
attempting to ultimately bring reviews down to perhaps three or so paragraphs
on average. Of course as said, the content within the reviews will not change;
rather, I will now be directly
getting my points across without relying on massive paragraphs to do such. And,
if this works out, this will also mean readers can expect consistent reviews.

On topic with this review, however, first
I would like to thank the requester for sending this song in. The requester did
give an option of choosing VARISTY’s “U R My Only One” or “Hole in One,” and
indeed I have opted to review their debut song (“U R My Only One”) as I find it
would bring a more interesting discussion than their recent comeback. Nonetheless,
thank you to the requester for sending this in. As always, requests are very
helpful as it allows me to review songs that readers want, and it allows me to
stay updated on which releases are currently trending and that people are
curious about in a critical sense.

Now, before getting right into VARSITY’s
debut song, there are two clarifications I need to make. One is, from here on
and forward, I will refer to the song as “URMOO”; typing out the usual title is
proving to be more laborious than necessary and hence this abbreviated form.
Thus, I hope readers do not become confused and assume I am somehow talking
about cows. Horrible joke aside, for the more serious clarification, there
appears to be—from my perception—an audio fault with this song. By “audio fault”
I refer not to the composition of the song—in other words, how the song was
created via intentional sounds,
sections, layout, and so on. Instead, I am referring to how the audio that
appears in the music video (and in other sources on YouTube) seem to be of a
poorer quality than usual. This was the case with Girls’ Generation’s Seohyun’s
“Don’t Say No,” and I do wonder if the same case applies to “URMOO.” Specifically
for what is wrong, the song sounds “pushed down”; a simple example is that the
song sounds akin to what one hears if they were under water. In other words,
the audio seems muddled versus of the usual crispness that one would expect in
a song. (In technical terms, if I am correct, I think there is too much reverb.)
For why this matters and why I even bring this up, I will assume this sound
effect is unintentional. Should it actually be intended then readers should
know that I personally view it as detrimental. Of course, however, since I am
making a bold accusation, I will assume the song is “innocent” and thus will
not be using this aspect as a point of critique.

All that covered, let us finally
discuss “URMOO.” Admittedly, while for a debut song “URMOO” is definitely
impressive especially as—unsurprisingly—debut songs tend to be artists’ weaker
songs given that artists are still significantly learning and improving (and
are not prepared to perhaps handle more complex song compositions), “URMOO” in
a general sense is rather average. Certainly the song has its strength in terms
of the men’s vocals and also in how the composition cleverly handles the song’s
flow and intensity, but ultimately the sonic aspect to the song is far too
basic. That shortcoming is what greatly limits the potential to “URMOO.”

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 5/10
(5.25/10 raw score) – “Average”


Vocals: 6/10


Sections: 5/10
(4.75/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Rap, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Chorus,
Conclusion

1.     Introduction:
5/10

2.     Verse: 5/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 4/10

4.     Chorus: 4/10

5.     Post-Chorus: 5/10

6.     Rap: 5/10

7.     Bridge: 5/10

8.     Conclusion: 5/10


Instrumental: 5/10


Lyrics: 5/10

[Introduction instrumental]

Never again
I said that it’s really over
Try again
You got me, you got me
(Please)
Cut by a blade
My heart will not heal
I’m not fine
I’m trying, the more I do,
I cry

If only I can turn back time
I wouldn’t lose you,
who was too good for me
I don’t think I can go on without you
Come back to me

You’re my only one
You’re my only one
You’re my lover
But time is over
You’re my only one
You’re my only one
I need you, baby
I want you, lady
(Woo) I didn’t know the answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one
(Woo) I realized my answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one

[Post-Chorus instrumental]

Yesterday, I told you to go
Today, come back to me
My broken heart needs you
Tell me the way to find you
When you’re not next to me
(Hold up)
Everything stops
I don’t need anything but you
Besides you, nothing’s better

If I can turn back your heart
I could give you all my love that I couldn’t before
I don’t think I can go on without you
Come back to me

You’re my only one
You’re my only one
You’re my lover
But time is over
You’re my only one
You’re my only one
I need you, baby
I want you, lady
(Woo) I didn’t know the answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one
(Woo) I realized my answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one

You always learn love after saying goodbye
I can’t erase you
You remain in my head
I’m looking for you, I can’t take it anymore
(Driving me crazy)

You’re my only one
You’re my only one
You’re my lover
But time is over
You’re my only one
You’re my only one
I need you, baby
I want you, lady
(Woo) I didn’t know the answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one
(Woo) I realized my answer
(Woo) Just, you’re my only one

[Conclusion instrumental]

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: One
of the main weaknesses to “URMOO” is simply how the aural aspect to it is far
from enticing. Now that said, it should be clarified that the song’s overall
sound suffices; it is not an unappealing
sound. The issue, though, is the opposite holds true as well: neither does the
song have an appealing sound. It
hovers in the middle—and hence the common five ratings littered throughout the
review.

For
an actual example to focus on, the instrumental provides insight on the song’s
overly basic sounds. With “URMOO” adopting a predominantly electronic-based instrumental,
one of the issues at hand already is how the song will prevent itself from
sounding mundane especially as electronic sounds ultimately all still sound
similar to each other. There are various solutions to this, and “URMOO”
definitely does have some—namely its usage of traditional instrumental sounds
(such as a piano) and “distorting” the electronic instrumental. Unfortunately,
I argue these strategies are still insufficient. For example, the composers’
usage of the two, differing sound styles—electronic versus “traditional”—are not
emphasized enough to truly leave listeners with a sense of variety. We find
this by how these two types of instrumental sounds are used less for their
actual sonic values and more for their structural values: the traditional
sounds reside during calmer sections while the electronic instrumental occurs
during the more intensive parts. Thus, the effect we get out of these two
instrumental types being contrasted is less on creating an aural effect and
simply more for listeners to be able to identify the song’s flow and intensity.

Nonetheless,
I argue this is quite problematic as the song does end up running through its
stagnant points: the electronic sounds do become dull no matter how distorted
and exciting it can get, and equally the traditional sounds follow suit.
Furthermore, if we also account VARSITY’s vocals, we also find that the
composers seem to separate this aspect as well. VARSITY’s singing is heavy on
precise tunes with the bonuses of slower moments or rapping, and though the
vocals are definitely the song’s best aural point, in the entirety of the song
we find that all these three sounds—vocals, electronic, and traditional
instrumental—do not work together. Instead, each aspect is used in their own
situation—and this we can literally hear by how the electronic-based choruses
only have “fillers” (lines of humming “woo”). Overall, if the composers at
least made it so that each distinctive sound group—vocals, electronic, and
traditional instrumental—was able to hold on its own, this composition idea
would have worked out. However, given that each one seems to rely on the other despite
clear divisions in place—such as the post-chorus having its solo electronic instrumental—it
leads “URMOO” sounding somewhat disorganized in an aural sense. That said, the
sounds in the song are not bad per se; if anything, it is the messier setup
that is the true problem as, if all three sounds were able to directly complement
each other, the song would sound
great. But, as is, “URMOO” sounds far too plain especially when all of the “sound
types” end up working on their own instead of one cohesive unit.

Regarding
where “URMOO” shines, even if the song in an aural sense is a bit stale, one
unique aspect is how the composers handle the song’s flow. Ironically, though,
the way the composers handled the song’s flow is by not handling it at all—in a somewhat figurative sense, of course,
as the composers seem to have very much intended this. Specifically for what I
am referring to, I wish for readers to notice how the song’s intensity plays
out. “URMOO” follows the usual pop music binary format in the sense of how
there is a buildup that is met with a climax, but what is quite interesting is
how the intensity naturally fades out rather than direct action taking place to
control that very fading. For example, the post-chorus best highlights this.
This section is placed right after the chorus—the typical climaxing point of
pop songs, and indeed this is the case for “URMOO.” The effects from the
post-chorus, though, is that it allows “URMOO” to relax its heightened, upbeat
state in a manner that perfectly suits with the song’s sonic component—in other
words, a chance for an electronic solo. Likewise, even on the side of hyping up
the song, we find some subtle strategies implemented. The rap is another solid
example: this moment follows right after the post-chorus, and given that the
rapping followed a quicker and strong pacing, it easily allowed “URMOO” to flow
right back into the pre-chorus—a section that begins hastening the song. And
so, even if the song’s sounds lack chemistry, we have to acknowledge that on a
structural level the song is definitely linked. Each section manages to flow to
the next fluently, and with the rapping and post-chorus, I argue their roles
were well developed and are rather effective in action.

All
in all, “URMOO” is a song that has potential. Structurally, the composers created
a very cohesive song. Unfortunately, though, when it comes to the actual sounds
used, besides already using a rather typical concept of being heavily electronic-based,
the composers come short with making all of the sounds work with one another.
As it stands, the song lacks variety in terms of its physical sounds
particularly because each distinctive sound—be it the electronic-based
instrumental or traditional instrumental or even vocals—is used merely to
indicate where the song is in a
structural sense. If the composers were able to make the electronic sounds work
directly with the vocals or at the very least so that the electronic sounds in
of themselves had more of a value besides indicating that a listener is at the
choruses, perhaps “URMOO” would be much stronger.

Overall,
VARSITY’s debut song holds as average. While fans might be disappointed as they
expected this song to be much stronger, we have to bear in mind this is their debut song. In my personal experience
and opinion, many—many—debut songs
are weaker than usual and are never a fair gauge to a group’s music qualities. This
is expected as idols are still developing their vocal skills; companies are
still experimenting with appropriate song concepts; and ultimately that more
complex song compositions—the “better” songs—are saved until artists are ready
for them. For some examples off the top of my head, here are a few debut songs
that I would review as “weaker”: MAMAMOO’s “Mr. Ambiguous”; GFriend’s “Glass
Bead”; TWICE’s “Like Ooh-Ahh”; Infinite’s “Come Back Again”; Red Velvet’s “Happiness”;
and so on. For why I am specifically mentioning these artists, despite me
supposedly calling their debut songs weaker, a majority of readers will easily
recognize that these groups are definitely now at the top and do have many solid songs. The point is
this: debut songs tend to be already weaker songs and thus, I hope fans realize
that VARSITY’s debut song being held as average is already very impressive, and
furthermore that improvement will
come. VARSITY can only improve from here and onwards, and while I am not
reviewing their latest comeback of “Hole in One” to see if any significant
improvements have occurred yet, I hope fans do not feel “discouraged” by this
review’s rating should that be the case.

_______________________________________________________

I
personally find this to be one of my weaker reviews yet. That said, it perhaps
is more concise than usual reviews as I focused not on analyzing each section
in fine details, but instead focused more on the main points I wanted to make
about the song. To the requester, I hope this review provides new insights to
the song and that the review encourages all readers to be critical of it. Once again,
thank you for sending in this request.

As
for future reviews, I definitely plan to review LABOUM’s “Hwi Hwi” and perhaps
even IU as a friend did suggest I give her latest song a review. There are
definitely a lot more artists to cover besides these, of course, but the list
will begin here and more so as I have yet to review these artists. Look forward
to most likely “Hwi Hwi” as the next review. Until next time, “You’re my only
one”—which makes absolutely no sense except depicting me as an overly clingy
and desperate reviewer. Then again, that is partially true. Jokes aside, look
forward to “Hwi Hwi” and many more reviews to follow especially as I am on
summer break.

Cosmic Girls – “I Wish” Review

(Dance Practice)

Cosmic Girls/WJSN – I
Wish

Reviewed
on February 17, 2017

Finally,
this takes us to our review. Although Cosmic Girls is flourishing with their
choreography and have solid stage presence for “I Wish,” I argue their weaker vocal
execution in the song is what greatly holds it back. The song in theory does
play out decently as we will discuss, but in application with how the vocals are
delivered, the song loses much of its appeal.

Personal Message:
It has been almost two weeks since
the last review—this being perhaps the longest delay the blog has seen. To
explain the absence of reviews, I have been incredibly busy with university.
Moreover, though, I have been using my “review time” to instead subtitle a few
videos along with preparing a lesson that I taught to seventh graders and
indeed, all of this took up the time that would have been for reviewing songs.
(On the random note of teaching seventh graders, it should be clarified that this
is not due to the fact that I am officially teaching. Rather, I am still
gathering experience and teaching informally. That said, I am able to have teaching
sessions as my current “cooperating teacher” is incredibly welcoming, helpful,
and overall is such a wonderful person.)

Nevertheless, I greatly apologize to
the requester of this current review and additionally another requester who has
been patiently waiting for their request on BTS’ “Dead Leaves.” I hope to spend
this weekend catching up and to finally get to a bonus post that focuses on
technicalities of sound in general. Especially since February is a shorter
month, I do feel quite pressured to simply get out as many reviews as possible while
still, of course, inputting a genuine amount of effort and care per post. And on
a random note, an additional bonus post will be coming out soon: a post that
provides a discussion on how SPICA, a very vocally-skilled group, can somehow
never receive spotlight and are now on “hiatus” (of which is SPICA’s Narae’s
gentler way of saying the group is temporarily disbanding). In short, I plan to
discuss—in a speculative sense—what it actually takes to be popular in the
K-Pop scene since, akin to almost all pop cultural music around the world, there
is a lot more than just music at
play.

But, let us now focus on what we
currently care more about: Cosmic Girls’ “I Wish.” (And to address potential
confusion, the group is also referred to as WJSN due to abbreviations if
correct. However, Cosmic Girls is the official name similar to how Girls’
Generation is the official name for that group versus their abbreviation of SNSD
and thus, I will refer to Cosmic Girls as their official name from here and onwards.)
With “I Wish,” to already discuss it in a somewhat critical fashion, I wish—no
pun intended—to clarify that the song is something that I term
“performance-based”; in other words, the beauty and strengths of the song is
more in its choreography and stage presence than the song’s own sounds and
composition.  

As we will shortly get into, I will
argue the song is relatively weak. In fact, statistically speaking, it is a
tenth away from being labeled as “slightly below average.” This is personally
shocking as if I recall correct, the requester did mention they believed this
group was underrated. Now in a general sense, I do agree: Cosmic Girls
certainly have brilliant dancing skills and their songs are not utterly weak—and,
of course, it would be nice for every group to receive a “healthy” amount of
popularity. (In a somewhat cynical manner, by “healthy” I refer to the amount
that allows a group to be financially stable. I do assert that life is much more than money, but indeed we have
to be realistic and acknowledge that finances are a huge driving force to
artists—or the lack thereof when it comes to groups being quite inactive due to
faring poorly with profits.) But even so, on a more critical level—and more so
if focusing on music—I disagree with
the requester: Cosmic Girls, I argue, have yet to release any stunning songs
that would make them “deserving” (again in a loose sense) of more popularity.

However, putting aside pessimistic outlooks
on the ladies, I think Cosmic Girls definitely have the room to grow. In fact,
I like how Starship Entertainment is handling the group: the songs they receive
tend to be decent in the realms of composition and production. To be clearer, the
songs themselves—ignoring the vocals, essentially—tend to actually be decent
songs if we analyze the structures, the instrumental, how the song flows, and
so forth. What lacks the most for Cosmic Girls, then, is themselves: their singing
and rapping. If the vocal execution on their part improves—and indeed, this is
basically a guarantee if the ladies practice and train—then over time I foresee
Cosmic Girls faring very well with possessing both solid dancing skills and vocal skills and decently composed songs. And indeed, this is the ultimate goal
of all groups: to be adept at both dancing and singing (and rapping) and have
stronger songs. (Since I mentioned SPICA, they provide an “inverse” example to
Cosmic Girls’ situation and this might make more sense for readers. SPICA is
very vocally impressive but, especially given their last comeback, their songs’
production can be weaker. Barring “Tonight” and especially “Ghost,” many of
their other songs lack in composition despite their vocals always shining and
thus, their songs are still overall average even if they individually excel
with singing and rapping.) Overall, point being is this: Starship Entertainment
has handled the composition and production of Cosmic Girls’ songs well. Now,
though, it is time for Cosmic Girls themselves to elevate their singing to an
even higher stage.

Finally, this takes us to our
review. Although Cosmic Girls is flourishing with their choreography and have
solid stage presence for “I Wish,” I argue their weaker vocal execution in the
song is what greatly holds it back. The song in theory does play out decently
as will discuss, but in application with how the vocals are delivered, the song
loses much of its appeal.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 5/10
(4.50/10 raw score) – “Average”


Vocals: 3/10


Sections: 4/10
(4.43/10 raw score)

Introduction, Chorus,
Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Rap, Bridge, Chorus,
Conclusion

1.     Introduction:
5/10

2.     Verse: 4/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 5/10

4.     Chorus: 3/10

5.     Rap: 3/10

6.     Bridge: 5/10

7.     Conclusion: 6/10


Instrumental: 5/10


Lyrics: 6/10

[Introduction instrumental]

Just tell me why
You only want to walk on flower paths
Tell me why
This girl only wants to be loved
Tell me why
Boy and girl, walking on a flower path
Then we met destiny (destiny)

When you pass me by,
I tremble so much
You wake my heart up,
like early flower petals
You are building up in me

I’m so fine, look so fine, I look pretty
Because I’m receiving love more and more
Out of all these people,
only you are the most handsome
of all the universe

Just tell me why
You only want to walk on flower paths
Tell me why
This girl only wants to be loved
Tell me why
Boy and girl, walking on a flower path
Then we met destiny
Tell me love, talk to me
Oh oh oh, I’m curious
(Tell me why)
Is this the love I wanted?

We’re resembling each other, more and more
The distance is getting closer
The more we spend time together,
the more my heart trembles

Hurry and walk into my heart
No one has ever told me
Out of all these people,
only you are the most handsome
of all the universe

Just tell me why
You only want to walk on flower paths
Tell me why
This girl only wants to be loved
Tell me why
Boy and girl, walking on a flower path
Then we met destiny
Tell me love, talk to me

Each day is like a dream
On this road that is made with your love
There remains our footsteps
I hope it’s you when I open my eyes

I’m gonna go blind at this rate
You’re dazzling, did you swallow light?
You’re a miracle that came to me
Now I’m holding my hands out so I can reach

Just tell me why
You only want to walk on flower paths
Tell me why
This girl had a lot of secrets
Tell me why
Walking on this path like a picture
We met destiny
A different landscape is before our eyes
Oh oh oh so beautiful
You and I, it’s like a dream
Boy and girl, walking on a flower path
Then we met destiny
Suddenly, you are close, in front of me

[Conclusion instrumental]

_______________________________________________________

Analysis:
While numbers can never quite speak for themselves, I do find the current
ratings misleading. After all, it appears that the song is not excellently composed if the sections themselves are scoring
poorly—but this is not the case due to a particular reason as will get to. “I
Wish” in of itself definitely possesses compositional strengths.

For
example, the sections are cohesive. Even if the choruses sound poorly, it is difficult to deny how to the sections flow well
into one another. Transitions between each section are subtle yet beneficial
and one moment in particular is worth much praising: the pre-choruses. Relating
back transitions, both the “before” and “after” transitions are smooth to this
section, but more importantly the sections’ conduct is brilliant. Consider how
the pre-choruses open: slower, calm vocals and instrumental which then
gradually build towards a minor note hold. It is incredibly effective for the
song in whole of reaching its climactic peaks (the choruses, as is typically
the case) but also doing such grants the song appeal via variety. Especially in
juxtaposition to the other sections that do not
offer that level of diversity, the pre-choruses become a key core of “I Wish”
as it is structurally quite solid and sonically provides some appeal. Likewise,
other features are decent to the song: the lyrics for its creative plot and
somewhat varied details; and lastly its instrumental for providing the song a
reliable foundation even if it partially lacks sonically. And yet, readers
still might have a critical question in mind: but why are the sections still poorly
rated for the most part? Answering that is our next focus.

In
short: the vocals are indirectly affecting the sections, hence why for example
the pre-chorus is still rated as average even when it is a rather impressive
section given what it provides for the song and how creative it is. Now while
sections oftentimes are not associated with vocals per se, we have to understand
everything is still fundamentally connected. For example with the pre-chorus,
as discussed it is structurally
strong: within the section it remains quite diverse and fluid, and in an
overarching view the section transitions the song and helps in the process of
building it up. Nonetheless, the raw sounds
that occur are weaker but we still have to acknowledge those sounds to a
section are still ultimately a part of it. With this in mind, let us focus on a
few specific aspects.

The
choruses are arguably the song’s weakest part. The main, impairing aspect is
how monotonous this section comes across. Instrumentally and vocally, there is
little variation at play. At most there is a slight change in pace towards the
latter half of the choruses, but for the most part the sections sonically and
structurally are too rigid. Furthermore, the attempts to break out of the
sections’ tedious format—the electronic vocals added (and more specifically, I
am referring to the “auto-tuned” parts) throughout the choruses—prove futile
and, more detrimentally, do quite the opposite. With vocals that carry minimal
strain and intensity and equally an instrumental that is predominantly
recycling basic, electronic noises, piling onto all of this the auto-tuned
vocals that are equally meshed into the instrumental make the choruses sound
more monotonous. Should some variety take place—perhaps some added vocal power
or a slightly more complex tune—the choruses would have performed better.

Another
section worth covering is the rap. This section is perhaps the worst in “I Wish”
as it lacks both in execution and composition. For one, the placement of the
rap is already peculiar: after a chorus. Now on the one hand I understand why
this was chosen: it allows the rap to seamlessly transition in—and indeed, this
is very much true and as discussed earlier, cohesion is a huge strength to “I
Wish.” Nevertheless, on the other hand it should be noted that because of how
the rap itself plays out—being tedious in its sound and flow as the rap had
minimal fluctuations and ultimately only had speed as its charming point—it almost
sounds as a mere extension to the already stale, repetitive choruses. If either
the choruses were more diverse or if the rap’s execution allowed it to differentiate
from the current choruses’ sound, the rap would have worked very well. As is,
unfortunately, the rap is in a difficult situation of fitting structurally but
not sonically.

If
not for the weaker vocal delivery in “I Wish,” many of the current issues I
pointed us to could have been avoided entirely. Again, I wish to emphasize that
the song’s composition is actually decent; if the vocals were somehow more
diverse be it through added power or a more complex tune, then the current
sections as is appear fine. The rap section’s situation is the best example of
what I am attempting to get at—after all, as said it fits perfectly in the song
but given how it vocally sounds along with how the choruses vocally sound, it
no longer sounds suitable as it becomes far too monotonous. Even if the song
miraculously scores at a five, we need to bear in mind that that is not quite the
case: it is nearly a four and therefore a “slightly below average” one.

All
this said, while I have been rather critical of Cosmic Girls, it should be
clarified that my words are not to be interpreted as bashing the members
personally or with their skills. On a general level, their singing is still “good”;
even if I am heavily critiquing them on that level, we all need to acknowledge that
they are still singers and therefore “can
sing.” My critique, then, is not to claim they should not be singers or that
they are bad at singing but rather
that their singing within the context of
“I Wish” is inappropriate for it. Additionally, without doubt their vocals will
improve over time and given that Starship Entertainment is handling the composition
and production of Cosmic Girls’ songs quite well as mentioned, this means that
Cosmic Girls will begin excelling in
the future. Fans should very much continue to support the ladies and I
personally look forward to their future releases. Besides, as a future post
will soon discuss, K-Pop is not just purely about the audio to a song: it
involves the choreography, stage presence, attending shows, and so on. With
Cosmic Girls holding well with their dancing and—from watching a few videos—them
being quite entertaining on shows, the group is still worth supporting and
caring for.

_______________________________________________________

Huge
apologies to the requester of this review, but it finally is released. I am
still running with the plan of keeping reviews condense and focusing more on
critical moments, so I hope this was able to come across in this review.
Likewise, I hope the review is thought-provoking and not just, say, “emotional-provoking”
as I hope the points I bring up are disagreed (or agreed) with in a respectful,
mature manner versus fans being purely reactive without giving deeper thoughts.

For
the next review, look forward to BTS’ “Dead Leaves”—a request that I am quite
late on—and two bonus posts that will discuss SPICA’s hiatus and music
equalizers. Thank you to all for reading this review in full or skim. I
appreciate it all. Look forward to the next post and know that “You wake my
heart up, like early flower petals.”