PRISTIN – “Wee Woo” Review

(Music Video—Dance Version)

PRISTIN – Wee Woo

Reviewed
on April 29, 2017

image

Regarding how the review will go,
despite how many fans might appreciate “Wee Woo” as being catchy and unique or
that it merely needs extra playbacks to be deemed good as many fans have
claimed, I disagree that the song is satisfying or even unique. Harshly said, I
find that “Wee Woo” is a highly generic pop song if we focus on certain
strategies the composers have employed, and furthermore, while the song’s
generic, bubbly musical concept appears as unique we still ultimately have to
realize it is just that: generic.

Personal Message:
It is currently “dead week” for my
university—a term that refers not to the fact that professors are no longer
assigning work due to the week before finals, but rather to the fact that
students are mentally dead. Morbid humor aside, I do want to clarify to readers
that I am indeed alive—although finals are actually happening right on May 1.
This semester has been quite busy and thus, reviews for April were essentially
nonexistent. In fact if correct, April saw only one review—if excluding the April’s Fool prank: EXO’s “Call Me Baby.”
For this summer break, while I will be finally learning how to drive and taking
up a few non-official jobs, I expect it to be quite free and thus I will spend
a lot of time catching up on reviews. Furthermore, I feel inspired to finally
begin learning how to write much more concisely and effectively. As a result,
readers might be seeing a review every other day during summer, and even once
the next semester comes around—one that will be the most challenging and busy—I
would at least be able to review a song every four days versus the current
school schedule of a review per week or two weeks.

And so, let us already begin
focusing on PRISTIN and less on technical updates. As readers might have
noticed, the prior post did involve PRISTIN: I wrote a Critical Discussion post
regarding an incident the ladies and their staff had with a rather questionable
“fan.” Readers who are curious should refer to the post itself as I will no
longer comment on it directly. But indeed, the topic regarding genuinely
obsessed fans is one that should be addressed and cared about and thus, I hope
readers spend some time either reading the post or at least pondering over it.

On topic with PRISTIN, however, in a
musical sense, I have planned to review “Wee Woo” at least three days after it
was released. Quite clearly, three days somehow became two months or so. However,
even if “Wee Woo” is no longer trending in the sense of being a recent
comeback, I find that the song’s composition is fascinating and is perhaps one
that entails not just a discussion on the song in of itself, but also a
discussion on debut songs in general.
For what I mean, especially if we bear in mind PRISTIN’s first album and those
other songs that have been composed and executed, “Wee Woo” is—in my opinion—a
far inferior song than many of the other songs within the ladies’ first album. “Wee
Woo,” then, is what I personally term a “high-risk; high-reward” song—and in
the context of how this is PRISTIN’s debut song, it actually makes sense on why
a potentially weaker song would be used over much stronger songs that exist in
their album.

Regarding how the review will go,
despite how many fans might appreciate “Wee Woo” as being catchy and unique or
that it merely needs extra playbacks to be deemed good as many fans have
claimed, I disagree that the song is satisfying or even unique. Harshly said, I
find that “Wee Woo” is a highly generic pop song if we focus on certain
strategies the composers have employed, and furthermore, while the song’s
generic, bubbly musical concept appears as unique we still ultimately have to
realize it is just that: generic.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 3/10
(3.00/10 raw score) – “Below average”


Vocals: 3/10


Sections: 4/10
(3.86/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Rap, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Conclusion (Chorus)

1.     Introduction:
6/10

2.     Verse: 3/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 3/10

4.     Chorus: 3/10

5.     Rap: 5/10

6.     Bridge: 2/10

7.     Conclusion (Chorus): 5/10


Instrumental: 3/10


Lyrics: 2/10

Wee woo, wee woo, wee
We are Pristin
(Hello)

I’m princess of our house
I like adventures
I want blow the balloon that is you
Pop
When it pops,
what will be there?

There are boys who like me lined up
Oh why, why?
But why aren’t you in that line?
Oh why, why?
Dazzling, my heart is crumbling
You’re my super, super hero
Dazzling, my heart is crumbling
You’re my super hero
Ring ring, hello?
Can you send an ambulance here?
When our eyes meet, I get dizzy

I like you, I like you, boo boo
My heart is pounding
I like you a lot, boo boo
When I look at you, my heart goes
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
It’s dangerous
Wee woo, wee woo, wee

I’m waiting, I go crazy when I see you
My heart is going at 100km
I made up my mind, I want you
Right now, stay right where you are

There are boys who like me lined up
Oh why, why?
But why aren’t you in that line?
Oh why, why?
Dazzling, my heart is crumbling
You’re my super, super hero
Dazzling, my heart is crumbling
You’re my super hero
Ring ring, hello?
Can you send an ambulance here?
When our eyes meet, I get dizzy

I like you, I like you, boo boo
My heart is pounding
I like you a lot, boo boo
When I look at you, my heart goes
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
It’s dangerous
Wee woo, wee woo, wee

I’m rubbing the lamp baby
Casting a spell so I can have you
Sun, moon, stars, I’m asking them all
to cast a spell
Did the spell work?
Let’s check

I like you, I like you, boo boo
My heart is pounding
I like you a lot, boo boo
When I look at you, my heart
(spills out)
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
It’s dangerous
Wee woo, wee woo, wee
Wee woo, wee woo, wee

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: Sometimes
I do wonder if my current university-related stress is making me overly critical. But, I hope with my
reasons and arguments, readers can see where my position comes from and of
course, I definitely encourage readers to openly disagree with my reviews as
the very purpose of them is that: to start discussions. With the review, as we
can tell, the song scores disturbingly low: a three for below average. This has
definitely not occurred in quite some time, but unfortunately “below average”
serves as the appropriate term I would use to describe “Wee Woo.”

Already,
one significant problem to “Wee Woo” is how the vocals are executed. The
choruses provide the best example: much of the vocals follow an overly
strained, higher pitched sound and at the choruses themselves, auto-tune has
been used in the production stage to create a robotic sound. Now before further
expanding that point, a clarification is needed: contrary to the belief that
auto-tune is automatically used to “fix” singing, auto-tune in a majority of
situations is purposefully used for merely its sound effects. After all,
auto-tune rarely “fixes” singing and—as in “Wee Woo” ‘s case—it arguably does
the opposite with breaking singing.
Thus, it is the effect the composers are seeking out and indeed, PRISTIN are
all very capable vocalists as seen in other album songs. But on topic for why
this matters, the auto-tune used here and equally the overly strained, high
pitched singing are detrimental to the song in whole. All of this creates an
excessively mundane sound in the song as there are minimal deviations in the
physical sound itself: everything—barring perhaps moments at the
pre-choruses—is sung in this strained, robotic-like sound. That is definitely
not beneficial if the song itself does not manipulate that for other purposes.

To
compare “Wee Woo” to a song that does arguably use auto-tune to a beneficial
effect, T-ARA’s “Sugar Free” is the song that comes to mind. In “Sugar Free,” the
auto-tune part is to build upon the instrumental’s already robotic sounds, and
additionally, the important feature in “Sugar Free” is that the auto-tuned
singing is used to contrast to standard, highly tuneful vocal beltings that
occur at the choruses. In “Wee Woo,” though, we do not see any of those
strategies implement; rather, we merely hear auto-tune for its individual sonic
appeal—and sadly, that is an unwise decision in my view as auto-tune is best
used on a structural and strategic sense rather than an appealing sound. But
before “Wee Woo” ‘s auto-tune is completely disregarded as useless, I do admit
it has its strength in the song’s structure: the auto-tune singing and the
overly strained singing create a distinctive, highlight point in the choruses
and that serves as an easily identifiable climax to the song. However, this is
a marginal benefit as the downside to this idea—the loss of vocal appeal and
even overall sonic appeal in general—is far more significant.

As
for other problems we encounter, I find that many of the song’s sections are
questionable composed—even if, indeed, there are some brilliant thinking in
mind. Let us examine the pre-chorus for an example. One interesting aspect to
this section is how it essentially builds upon itself; in other words, the
pre-choruses almost have a pre-chorus within themselves. We notice this by how
the pre-chorus initiates with an upbeat, tuneful style but later transitions to
a dramatic, slower style. That, though, is then used as a foundation for the transition
point to send “Wee Woo” to its choruses. Quite obviously, on a superficial
level, this is very creative composing—and indeed, it is and I do not wish
to deny this. The composers do deserve credit for this creative and new
take to pre-choruses. What is not foreseen, however, is how the pre-choruses
ironically undermine themselves. On a general layer, the pre-chorus builds up
the song but when the “second” or “inner” pre-chorus arrives, it ends up taking
away that generated hype and instead starts the whole process right from where it began. This, though, does not create more
hype in the long run. It is a method that is rather inefficient, if anything. If the song took
the pre-choruses’ inner pause but then made such pause work in a manner so that when hype was built up again that the build up would then be perceived as even more intense, then this pre-chorus
form would be quite beneficial. But in this case, it literally undermines its
own work as any generated hype is simply removed.

Furthermore,
this is also problematic when we consider how the instrumental is quite absent
and plays a very passive role. Now, certainly it is typical for instrumental
sounds to take a silent stance during pre-choruses as the return of said
instrumental sounds can serve as a form of building hype and then reaching a
climax, but in “Wee Woo,” the choruses return with a stereotypical, bouncy pop
instrumental. In other words, the instrumental’s disappearance was not in hopes
of creating hype as, if that was the case, the choruses would have had a much more impactful and exciting
instrumental rather than the current instrumental that is plain. Thus, the expected trade of not having an active instrumental during the
pre-choruses for a stronger chorus did not occur; instead, there is merely a
loss of, in this case, having a stale pre-chorus for the sheer sake of it. (And
of course to clarify, this is not to say all pre-choruses must have an active instrumental at play. Each review focuses on a
song’s individual context, and in our case, “Wee Woo” ‘s main weakness of
having minimal variety is why this structure to the pre-choruses is troubling.)

Finally,
for another section worthy of mentioning—in a negative manner, that is—it would
be the bridge. This section lacks in all areas: both sonically and
structurally. On an aural level, the singing follows, as established throughout the song, a robotic
and lifeless singing style. Structurally, the bridge’s dramatic pause fails to suit
in with the rest of “Wee Woo,” and this sudden change was not gradually hinted
throughout the song and thus, the bridge’s form is even more unsuitable to the
song in whole.

And
so, fans might be wondering if there are any possible strengths at all to “Wee
Woo.” My answer: of course there are—every
song has its strengths and weaknesses, after all. One strong point to “Wee Woo”
is the rapping. Even if it is not the best per se, it is definitely a highlight
of the song and is fluently transitioned to. Additionally, though, despite “Wee
Woo” seemingly being a weaker song, we can argue that it ultimately still
succeeds in a commercial sense—and this is what I hinted at earlier in this
review regarding a discussion on “high-risk; high-reward.” With that cliché
phrase, I hoped to capture the idea that “Wee Woo” is somewhat poorly composed
not due to composers lacking the skills and knowledge or that PRISTIN are weak
singers; instead, this was done to manipulate the attention PRISTIN would
receive. Where the risk comes in is that, should this plan work—and I argue, it
actually does—then it would be a huge success as PRISTIN would get more attention. On the other hand, should it
fail, PRISTIN is left with minimally gained popularity and are rendered as a
musically weak group.

To
explain why the manipulation was a success and even what this “manipulation” is, for a debut song, we have to
understand that the main goal is truthfully not musically orientated at all;
rather, the truth is that debut songs are intended to garner as much attention
as possible. Now of course, there are two main ways to approach such: through
raw musical appeal or through merely getting attention such as through
conceptual ideas of a comeback (examples being “cute,” “sexy,” “powerful,”
“cool,” and the like). Pledis Entertainment chose the latter method with “Wee Woo”:
getting attention not through music, but through sheer attention itself. This
explains why the song is incredibly catchy and even excessively pop-like as all of these, even if musically unenticing,
will gather attention—both good and bad. And if we follow this speculation, it
also might explain why the rest of the album possesses the seemingly more
complex and better composed songs: “Wee Woo” is the comeback to get attention;
the rest of the album songs are for actual musical appeal.

Coming
to the end of this review, what are fans to make of “Wee Woo,” then, and its
relation to PRISTIN’s musical skills? Given that “Wee Woo” has led PRISTIN to
gaining more popularity (and with how two members are former members of I.O.I),
I do encourage fans to interpret “Wee Woo” less as a genuine musical piece and
unfortunately more as a financial tool—even if this, indeed, is quite
pessimistic and personally goes against what I consider music to stand for. More
pessimistic individuals might claim that all
pop music is composed with the intent of purely making profit, but I find that
while money is of course in mind and necessary with creating music, it should
never be the first priority. With “Wee Woo,” I critically believe that its
intent was in fact to make money and gather attention, but at least the rest of
the album songs appear to be composed with actual music appeal in mind.

All
in all, while “Wee Woo” is by far one of the weaker songs I have heard in
general, given that it has served its financial role, I hope future releases
focus less on gaining attention and more on producing excellent songs—of which
would, in turn, gain more fans for PRISTIN. Thus, fans should continue
supporting the ladies regardless of their comeback song’s quality, and that
those who are interested but repelled by “Wee Woo” ‘s weaker composition
continue to stay interested as future releases will most likely be
improvements.

_______________________________________________________

As
always, thank you to all for reading whether in full or skim. I miraculously
did manage to write this review in only one and a half hours—a record, perhaps.
But, given that all the analytical work was done even weeks prior, this is not
too surprising. Once summer break begins, readers can look forward to many
reviews returning. May currently has many new artists lined up to be reviewed,
after all. Until then, I will be finishing a ten-page essay (which is not too
bad given I have already outlined the essay) and asking readers: “Can you send
an ambulance here?”