TWICE – “TT” Review

(Music Video)

TWICE – TT

Reviewed
on October 24, 2016

Vocals do not necessarily have to be utterly dynamic and possessing a multitude of styles and forms, but in this song’s case of not having moments of noticeable changes, appeal is greatly lost.

Edit:
I have decided to post this sooner rather than on Halloween due to the song
trending and that I want to voice my opinion on the “hating” of TWICE.

Personal Message:
Here is a tale of two kids’
adventurous night. Little did they know, they were in for a fright. Or was that
last phrase not very polite? After all, it was TWICE who came to light! Indeed,
this reviewer shall see his mistake though only in hindsight. Besides, are
these rhymes not trite? While this poem fails to sound right, I will remind you
all: this review begins tonight—or at least that is when I write. So come
inside and sit tight; rest assured, you have enough might. Fans of TWICE may
feel, for this review, uptight—but I promise you all: this is all for delight.

And that is enough rhyming and
probably not worth the many minutes I spent pondering over words that would
rhyme and still make sense in some
form. Perhaps I was overly optimistic when I challenged myself to write this
entire Personal Message in rhyme. On topic, while I hope readers enjoy the
horrible poetry (and admittedly I very much dislike poetry except for perhaps The Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti—a
great read for those wanting a poem that can be analyzed through a multitude of
literary/social lenses), if not clear on why I took on that playful route, it
is Halloween as of this review’s posting date. Coincidentally, while searching
for K-Pop songs that had a spookier tone, TWICE had a comeback that aligned
perfectly with this. Thus, it is a win-win situation: I get a holiday-themed
review (for those whose culture celebrates it, of course; ironically enough, I
personally do not celebrate it minus in the form of this review) all while reviewing
a comeback of arguably the top rising female group. Transitioning now to a more
serious tone, though, let us begin discussing TWICE.

As some readers may know, I have
reviewed their debut song (“Like Ooh-Ahh”). While I will not link the review,
readers can easily find it in the blog’s archive. Most importantly to take away
from that review are two main points: for the simple one, TWICE did not
musically impress me nor did the song’s production; but more importantly, for
the second point, that even if a song scores poorly this does not mean an
artist is bereft of musical skills. With the latter point, more often than not,
I would argue it is a song’s production that controls quality more than the
artists’ skills. A simple and relevant example is I.O.I’s final song: “Very
Very Very.” Although I say the following words with much respect, that song is
rather mediocre and definitely a weaker song I have heard. Is this due to I.O.I
being incapable vocalists? Not at all; another song, “Hold Up,” is a fantastic
song and specifically with the vocals, I.O.I certainly shines. With TWICE, many
of these points apply—more so with “Like Ooh-Ahh” and “Cheer Up” as their past
songs have been exceptionally weaker ones (as I would argue).

Now of course for critical fans and
listeners—or perhaps those truly looking to bash
the ladies versus critiquing them
(yes, there is a difference; the former is never justified while the latter is
based on intellectual, mature discussions)—there is an opposing side to my
previous statements. One could easily argue: “What if TWICE receives weaker
song productions because they actually cannot
sing to higher standard?” To this, I have a few answers. For one, I personally
am not familiar enough with TWICE to fully understand their vocal capabilities.
In fact, I only know that Jihyo is their main vocalist and do not know the
other members’ musical positions (lead vocalist; sub/support vocalist, etc.). In
other words, this opposing argument is very much still valid: if it is
true—again, I personally do not know—that TWICE is overall vocally weaker than
most artists, this definitely would affect the songs they receive. On the other
hand, if it is true that TWICE are in fact solid singers but only receive
generic pop songs, then their vocals will never be disclosed to their fullest
potential. However, regardless of the heated musical debates, though I very
much cherish them and do believe listeners of pop music should go beyond merely
listening to a song and instead actively
listen to pop (a future review will discuss “active listening”), I believe listeners
have forgotten one point we all need to be reminded of: TWICE members are human
beings, too.

While it is definitely fair to
criticize them musically—that is, to maturely
challenge their musical skills and songs—sometimes listeners become overly zealous
in doing so to the point that we dehumanize TWICE members. For example, I have
read very atrocious comments about the ladies that are based not on, say,
sexism or racism, but on their supposed “lack of skills.” Based on supposedly
lacking musical skills, a few people have went to the degree of urging them to
quit their careers or that the ladies are complete failures and bring shame to
music. Again, sure these comments are not necessarily “socially dehumanizing,”
but even so, these comments on the basis of their music still very much hurt
TWICE members and completely disregards their accomplishments and hard work.

For what I wish to say to these
remarks and people, I understand the passion one feels when listening to rather
weak songs; it is true that it can be frustrating in a musical context, and
admittedly more so when a group is receiving much attention for “lacking
musical skills”—and let us be honest, TWICE is
getting quite popular. So, for people who see them as musically weak and yet
succeeding while other skilled groups are struggling to keep up, it makes sense
on why many bash TWICE. I definitely do not accept that behavior, though, and
this is where I will put in my honest take. Personally, I am not a musical fan of TWICE; I find their past
songs very poor and I personally do consider them a less musically skilled
group and at times am surprised at how popular they are getting despite such.
And yet, I consider myself a supporter of TWICE. That is right: as a critical
listener and pop music reviewer (and I do hope this does not sound
condescending), I am supporting a group that I do consider musically weaker.
Why do I do that? Because, besides how pop music is definitely more than just
the music itself such as with variety shows, I respect TWICE as the hard
working human beings they are. Sure,
“Cheer Up” was horrendous (from my argument) and yet it got them even more
popular, but this does not mean I have the privilege to now neglect the members
for who they are and what they have done. It is mentally and
physically difficult to be a K-Pop idol, and knowing how hard they worked to
get into the industry needs to be respected. Most importantly, though, at the
end of it all, they are humans. Humans. This is not to say we should never
criticize TWICE’s music; funny enough, after this digression ends, I will very
much hammer down on TWICE’s latest song. The point of this message, then, is
that we need to separate music from
the social: we can criticize TWICE’s music and
still be decent, compassionate, loving human beings that support the ladies. (And
likewise, we can appreciate an artist’s musical works even if, for example, she
is very racist. Again we definitely need to challenge the social side of her,
but the music itself is its own context.)

In summary, for those who feel it is
unfair that TWICE is getting popular despite releasing weaker songs (and to
fans, notice that these “haters” are not just purely hating; there actually are
reasons for their bashing—though again, bashing is never permissible),
remember: it is just a song at the end of the day. So, for those against TWICE,
I do encourage criticizing their songs in a mature and intellectual manner (in
other words, explain why TWICE’s songs are “so bad” instead of just saying it)
but remember to not overextend that line. I can say “Cheer Up” is a bad song,
or more controversially, that Jihyo is a weaker main vocalist (not my personal
example, to clarify; it is one I am making up), but never can I ever be allowed to say Jihyo is a disgusting, shameful
and useless member—this has no relevancy to music and is attacking an artist
versus attacking her work.

All of this covered, and I do hope
TWICE fans spread the essence of that message: that TWICE can be supported and respected,
all while challenging their music. Besides that, though, we have another matter
to deal with: “TT.” Finally focusing on the review, I say with confidence that
TWICE’s song production is a bit more sophisticated this time and that “TT” is
by far the best song from the ladies. In fact, vocal improvements might even be
in place. However, the real question is whether “TT” is a strong song in
general. Sadly, in answer to that, I will use the song’s title: “TT”—in other
words, the emoticon for tears.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 5/10
(4.75/10 raw score) – “Average”


Vocals: 4/10


Sections: 5/10
(4.67/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Conclusion (Chorus)

1.     Introduction:
5/10

2.     Verse: 5/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 4/10

4.     Chorus: 4/10

5.     Bridge: 5/10

6.     Conclusion (Chorus): 5/10


Instrumental: 6/10


Lyrics: 4/10

[Instrumental]

I’m in two minds
In an awkward situation
I just stare and say ba-ba-ba-baby
Every day I only imagine without asking
I talk casually and say your name, baby
But we don’t even know each other
Beautiful no matter what I wear
Just the two of us in the mirror having a
fashion show, show
This time for sure, I’ll be the first to talk, talk
But it’s only in my head, always only in my head

Na na na na na na na
I start humming and before I know it,
I feel like crying
I don’t feel like myself
This isn’t like me at all
I love you so much

Think I’m all grown up now
I’m free to make my own choices, but why
Why can’t I have it my way?
The more I try to push you away,
the more I’m drawn and attracted to you, baby
I’m like TT*
Just like TT
You don’t know how I feel
So mean, so mean
I’m like TT
Just like TT
Tell me that you’d be my baby

You say I’m ridiculous
That I don’t live up to my looks
Doesn’t cheer me up at all, ba-ba-ba-baby
I’m going crazy in all this mess
Why do I feel hungry?
I eat all day and am still hungry
Slap slap slap slap
the innocent doll
I sit and lie down all day
Time flies flies flies
What’s with the dull skin again
Keep wanting to just complain
Mom keeps bothering me, why why why why?

Na na na na na na na
I start humming and before I know it
I feel so irritated, I’m so upset
I’m normally not like this
I love you so much

Think I’m all grown up now
I’m free to make my own choices, but why
Why can’t I have it my way?
The more I try to push you away,
the more I’m drawn and attracted to you, baby
I’m like TT
Just like TT
You don’t know how I feel
So mean, so mean
I’m like TT
Just like TT
Tell me that you’d be my baby

Do you realize what’s going on inside me?
Don’t disappear from my view like this
This time for sure,
I’ll be the first to talk, talk
But it’s only in my head,
always only in my head

Think I’m all grown up now
I’m free to make my own choices, but why
Why can’t I have it my way?
The more I try to push you away,
the more I’m drawn and attracted to you baby
I’m like TT
Just like TT
You don’t know how I feel
So mean, so mean
I’m like TT
Just like TT
Tell me that you’d be my baby

*TT is in reference to the emoticon of crying and tears running down.

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: Before
discussing the song itself, I forgot to mention another crucial reminder: that
catchiness, in my reviews and opinion, is an insufficient trait to justify as a
song’s strength. I bring up this point as admittedly “TT” is definitely one of
the catchiest songs I have heard. In a casual style of listening to music (such
as while exercising), “TT” indeed is very enjoyable due to its said catchiness.
However, as discussed in multiple reviews (refer to “Russian
Roulette”
and “Doo
Doom Chit”
) this trait will be something I overlook since we are going to
be critically engaging with—or better yet, actively
listening to—“TT.” At most, I will analyze how catchiness affects certain
aspects of the song, but readers should be aware that the fact that “TT” is
catchy is completely irrelevant in of itself. Finally onto the review itself,
while fans may not necessarily be satisfied at the overall rating being five
for average, fans should recall that “Like Ooh-Ahh” scored one rating less.

To
start, “TT” struggles with the same category that has been prevalent in all of
their title songs so far: vocals. Now to clarify, the extent of this is not
extreme; it is a four which indicates “slightly below average.” In an
overarching view, the vocals’ main drawback is the lack of diversity. Vocals do
not necessarily have to be utterly dynamic and possessing a multitude of styles
and forms, but in this song’s case of not having moments of noticeable changes,
appeal is greatly lost. From the verse to final chorus (conclusion), the vocals
per section are indistinguishable and possess a mundane sound after multiple playbacks.
I attribute this to how the vocals simply fail to deviate from one another
throughout: notice that there are minimal to no shifts in intensity, styles, or
even tune at times. For example—and to focus in a bit on a more individual
level—let us hone in on the choruses. While it is not a detriment for a chorus
to not be a high, upbeat, climactic point, the vocals in this section are
hardly established as unique when juxtaposed to the verse and pre-chorus. The
pacing, for example, remains roughly the same, and intriguingly the vocals’
tune do not become more complex than the verses’ vocal tunes. Now obviously
there are changes in tune as one may point out, but I am referring to how if we
draw ourselves back away: doing so reveals that, for the most part, the vocals
are in fact quite linear and all sound akin. In certain songs, this linear
vocal form can very much be the core strength of a song’s vocals, but as we
will discuss with the instrumental, this song does not appear to accommodate
this form and hence why the vocals are rated lower.

With
mentioning the instrumental, this category scored at a six and rightly so: it
is decent and augments the song in many ways. Sonically, the heavier bass
covers pitches that the vocals otherwise do not cover given their static, stale
nature. Structurally, the instrumental covers usual points well such as transitions
or aiding in making transparent the song’s crescendos (the “build up”) and decrescendos
(the “build down” or “relaxing”). Returning to the earlier point with the
vocals, however, although the instrumental covers for the vocals’ lacking
points, as said there is a paradox here. Because the instrumental delivers its
own linear flow but on lower notes in comparison to the vocals, while in
certain cases this dual similarity is beneficial, in “TT” it is arguably this
syncing that creates the dullness in the vocals. Given the deeper sounds of the
instrumental and its lack of higher pitched instrument sounds, the vocals
should then adopt that role of being dynamic to help compensate—but that does
not occur. Instead, the vocals follow a similar flow to the instrumental,
though on higher pitches. The result? “TT” moves in a straight fashion with
minimal changes throughout, and while the rhythm is certainly catchy, this
creates an overly stale song that, perhaps best said, sounds “stuck.”

Bearing
in mind the prior point, rather than blaming the instrumental itself on the
conflicts between the vocals and said instrumental, the true culprits to blame
are the sections. Since we have covered the sections’ faults in a more
overarching view, let us now focus in on individual ones. As seen by the
ratings, the song employs many average structures and techniques, and with some
in specific, the song actually falters with execution. Specifically with the
choruses and pre-choruses for example, in addition to once again the excessive
staleness that occurs from combining the vocals and instrumental, these
sections have some extra problems. The choruses’ second half’s pauses, for one,
may add some dynamic to the song’s plainer flow, but the problem here is the
vocals become additionally more dull as a result. Similarly, the pre-choruses
may be functional in transitioning the song—though admittedly the method is
already quite standard—but when it comes to the vocals, there is a sacrifice:
the vocals bounce back and forth like the instrumental, but doing so drains
away the vocals’ tunes and in place leaves lifeless, hollow vocal sounds.

Miraculously,
however, “TT” does still render averagely and that is agreeably with.
Essentially, “TT” is a song that is composed using very traditional pop forms
but that its downfall is in a slightly weaker execution with those forms. But,
overall, “TT” does mostly come away as an average pop song: catchy and fun, but
lacking complexity and more strenuous, impressive execution and composition.

_______________________________________________________

My
one week break ended, sadly, and today is the first day of classes once again.
That said, I do apologize for failing to truly catch up on reviews. I plan to
finish this month out with SHINee’s “1 of 1” and Hyuna’s “How’s This?” (and the
social discussion within that review). For the beginning of November, I plan to
review Apink’s “Only One” as this song is a solid example of how “active
listening” can change a song from being supposedly weak to being actually quite
impressive. (And indeed, I will have a digression on what it means to be an
active listener of music and on how to actually begin doing so.)

With
this review, while it was planned to be my Halloween special review, we will
consider this an early one. Regardless, I hope the review proves insightful and
engaging, and that the Personal Message would relate to many fans—and anti-fans—of
TWICE. As always thank you for reading or skimming, and “You don’t know how I
feel” when it comes to that so thank you very much. Look forward to the
upcoming reviews.

BTS – “Blood Sweat & Tears” Review

(Music Video) / (Live Performance) / (Audio;
unofficial upload)

BTS (Bangtan Boys) – Blood
Sweat & Tears

Reviewed
on October 16, 2016

The main hesitation, then, for why the
vocals are rated at a six and not quite a seven is due to one section in
particular: the choruses. These sections contain useless fillers. From a vocal
standpoint, the singing—or more accurately, mere speaking—of the choruses, and
of which are already vocally overly tedious, ruin the balance of “BST” ‘s
calmer, passive vocals.

Personal Message:
I am finally on break for one week,
and indeed getting away from university (though I still have much homework) is
delightful due to rest. With that, besides catching up on finally relaxing, I
will equally be catching up on reviews. I hope to finish at least three within
the week.

Regarding this review, first of all:
thank you to the requester for sending this in. It has been a while since the
prior request, and furthermore I am glad to receive a request on a song that
many fans are interested in. In fact, given that BTS is definitely one of the
more popular groups—and rightfully so after watching their performance of
“Blood Sweat & Tears”—this is the first time where I feel heavily burdened
to review a song: both with finishing it in a timely fashion, but more importantly
with actually bringing justice to the review itself. Nevertheless, even if this
review will gain a larger viewership due to it involving BTS, I will still be
“objectively subjective”; in other words, I will still review the song as I
deem fit and not be pressured to sway it into a good rating for the purpose of
fans. Optimistically, though, no pressuring is necessary: I foresee “Blood
Sweat & Tears” (and of which will be abbreviated as “BST” from here on for
convenience) scoring decently. However, do I confidently claim it is a strong
song per se and one of the better ones I have heard? Sadly, no amount of blood,
sweat, or tears would convince me of that.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 6/10
(6.25/10 raw score) – “Slightly above average”


Vocals: 6/10


Sections: 6/10
(5.67/10 raw score)

Introduction (Pre-Chorus/Chorus),
Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Conclusion
(Chorus)

1.     Introduction
(Pre-Chorus/Chorus): 7/10

2.     Verse: 6/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 6/10

4.     Chorus: 4/10

5.     Bridge: 5/10

6.     Conclusion (Chorus): 6/10


Instrumental: 6/10


Lyrics: 7/10

My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my last dance
My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my cold breath
My blood, sweat and tears

Even my blood, sweat and tears
Even my body, heart and soul
I know that it’s all yours
This is a spell that’ll punish me
Peaches and cream
Sweeter than sweet
Chocolate cheeks and chocolate wings
But your wings are wings of the Devil’s
In front of your sweet is bitter, bitter
Kiss me, I don’t care if it hurts
Hurry and choke me
so I can’t hurt any more
Baby, I don’t care if you get drunk
I’ll drink you in now
Your whiskey, deep into my throat

My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my last dance
My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my cold breath

I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot

I don’t care if it hurts, tie me up
So I can’t run away
Grab me tightly and shake me
So I can’t snap out of it
Kiss me on the lips, lips
Our own little secret
I want to be addicted to your prison
So I can’t serve anyone that’s not you
Even though I know,
I drink the poisonous Holy Grail

My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my last dance
My blood, sweat and tears
Take away my cold breath

I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot
I want you a lot, a lot, a lot

Kill me softly
Close my eyes with your touch
I can’t even reject you anyway
I can’t run away anymore
You’re too sweet, too sweet
Because you’re too sweet

My blood, sweat and tears
My blood, sweat and tears

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: As
readers can tell, “BST” does score at a six—and that is not a bad score at all.
Perhaps the best summary of this song is that it is a rather balanced one;
there are no extreme points in the song—musically and statistically. Every
aspect of the song relates to one another and thus, the outcome is a very cohesive
song. With this in mind, then, this review will focus not necessarily on critiquing
the weak points of the song; instead, the focus will be on why “BST” is not as strong as it could have been.

Beginning,
though, with a category the song excels in, the lyrics are phenomenal. Whether
the following words are accurate or not, I feel as if recent reviewed songs
have only been average with their lyrics. Furthermore, even other songs I have
been listening to as of the late seem dull in their lyrical content. However
when it comes to “BST,” the lyrics do not just meet my review standards—in specific,
containing a variety of details and delivering a creative, distinctive plot or
message—but they in fact exceed them. For example at each verse, not only are
they separate from every other section, but within the verses the given details
are incredibly thorough and complex. Moreover, even with moments of somewhat
repetitive lines—a key example being “My blood, sweat, and tears”—a higher
level of complexity still exists. It is not as if BTS is chanting, for a random
example, “My blood, blood, blood” or, even worse, “La la la la” (though
exceptions do exist when this is permissible); rather, this repeated phrase in
particular is one that is crucial to the lyrics’ overarching plot.

And
on that note, the lyrics’ plot is very unique—though in particular, the delivery of the plot. In truth, the plot
itself is not necessarily exclusive: it is of a main character who is trapped
in an implicitly abusive relationship. Though the plot topic is rather unnerving
and even disturbing, other (pop) songs have very much introduced this before
and therefore, it is not utterly new. Nevertheless, as mentioned, the delivery
of this very plot is where “BST” ‘s lyrics shine: the verses and bridge are
prime examples. At most for a critique—and for what arguably very much limits
the song in a musical sense as we will discuss—the choruses’ lyrics are rather
mediocre. It is unfortunately a repeated line that is no better than “La la la”
and the like. But given how the rest of it compensates over, a seven is still
in place.

Turning
our attention now to the more important aspects of the song, as hinted at in
the last paragraph, the current choruses in this song are “BST” ‘s weakest
point. I would boldly argue that if a certain modification were made to them, the
song might have actually scored a seven—or at least, the vocals and sections
would have. What change would I suggest? Before going there, let me first explain
why the scores are as is.

When
it comes to BTS’ vocals, I very appreciate this song being a solid example of
how decent singing does not equate to amazing note holds, constant vocal
beltings, or having complicated and rigorous tunes. BTS’ singing (and rapping
if one renders the verses as raps) focuses less on power and intensity and
instead prioritizes tune—but even so, it is in a simpler form. Essentially, the
pre-choruses’ are the most complex and intensive forms of singing—and indeed,
the vocals are quite delightful there. However, even if the verses for example
are less strenuous, the vocals there are still adequate as the focus becomes on
rhythm and flow—akin to rapping. (And once again, perhaps the verses are actually
more accurately labeled as the song’s raps.) The main hesitation, then, for why
the vocals are rated at a six and not quite a seven is due to one section in
particular: the choruses. These sections contain useless fillers. From a vocal
standpoint, the singing—or more accurately, mere speaking—of the choruses, and
of which are already vocally overly tedious, ruin the balance of “BST” ‘s
calmer, passive vocals. A mixture of harsh and tuneless lines are added when,
most likely, the removal of vocals during the choruses have been much more
desirable and maintain the vocals’ existing strengths.

Continuing
on with the topic of “BST” ‘s choruses, they also prove problematic when focusing
on the sections themselves. First, though, it should be clarified that the
sections are overall solid. The verses and pre-choruses, for examples, fulfill
their roles of progressing the song all while maintaining sonic appeal. Likewise,
the conclusion ends the song in a timely fashion, and in particular with the
introduction, this section is fantastic and, coincidentally, sets an example of
how the choruses should have been.

To
explain the introduction’s assets as its rating is remarkable (in comparison to
the rest, at least), its unique structuring of being both the pre-chorus and
chorus is already one point, but more critically let us examine why that structuring—the fact that it is
both the pre-chorus and chorus—is a benefit and beyond just the fact that it is
creative. For one, the pre-chorus’ form provides “BST” a hook: the vocals, as
discussed, are at their best form when it is the pre-chorus, and additionally,
the build-up of the pre-choruses—the crescendo if we wish to be technical—is effective
at just that. In other words, the crescendo creates a sense of anticipation;
the build-up makes listeners desire to hear what the song climaxes to—even if
it is at the very beginning of the song. If we are considering the role of the introduction
is to create that hook, the introduction does that perfectly. Moreover, though,
we must consider what including a short, pure instrumental chorus in the
introduction does: it satisfies the “climax” listeners automatically search for
without entirely leaking the true climaxes and it provides a seamless
transition into the song itself. Regarding the latter, specifically without
that transition point in the introduction, besides an abrupt entry into the
first verse, the crescendo would have been left unresolved, and given that the
next chorus does not arrive until a while, that would have too excessive of a
delay.

Now
returning to weaker points of the sections, the choruses, once again, are at
fault. Being exact, the added vocals are simply the main issue. Vocally, it remains
lacking as already discussed, but on a structural level, that insufficiency—the
fact that the vocals lack during the choruses—is now a further problem for the
section itself: the choruses, being dull and repetitive, defeat the supposed
climactic point of the song. “BST” does a fabulous job at progressing the song
to its core point, but that very point—the chorus—comes short by a large
amount. It is this that causes the choruses to be structurally weak, but more
drastically, the song in whole is now impaired by it. After all, if the
supposed climax of a song comes off as not
a climactic point, is that not disappointing?

Miraculously,
however, “BST” in its entirety still holds strong at a six. If the choruses
were less repetitive and stale in their format—perhaps by entirely removing the
vocals that occur during these sections—then everything else might have
potentially been augmented. As is, though, “BST” is a decent song but its
choruses are ones that very much limit its potential from going beyond its
current state. Overall, yes “BST” is slightly above average, but is it anything
more? As I have argued in this review, because of the choruses, the answer to
that question is a no: the vocals, sections, and overall progression of the
song are held back by the choruses. All in all, even if this critique on “BST”
is considered overly harsh, we must all still bear in mind the song is still decent. The lyrics are
brilliant, and of course, the vocals, sections, and instrumental are decent—the
problem is just that more could have
been obtained. I personally consider “I Need U” the best release from BTS so
far, but indeed I can agree “Blood Sweat & Tears” is still admirable and is
definitely not a disappointing comeback in any form.

_______________________________________________________

Two
more reviews are definitely to come by this week: Hyuna’s “How’s This?” and,
for a new artist to be reviewed on the blog, SHINee’s “1 of 1.” Addressing this
current review, I do feel that I failed to bring a more insightful discussion
to “Blood Sweat & Tears.” With that, I apologize to fans who might have a
desired a very thorough analysis of every aspect to the song. Nonetheless, I
hope I was able to convey my main critiques and praises of the song. Of course,
though, private feedback is always desirable so if any reader has some input
please do share them. And as always, readers should feel free to disagree with
my points; I am from a professional and on top of that music is always
subjective.

For
next time, look forward to the mentioned two reviews to come. I plan to finish
them both by this week as I have a week off from university. Until then, “You’re
too sweet.” Thank you for reading this review—in full or skimmed—and for being
quite patient with this review. And thank you very much to the requester of
this review; without the request, I would have very likely missed this review,
so thank you from me and from fans.

Please please PLEASE review BTS’s comeback. The song is called Blood Sweat & Tears. You’ll love it!!! Thank you from ARMY.

Hello there. I would be more than willing to review BTS’ comeback. Surprisingly, although BTS is arguably one of the most popular boy groups, I have yet to review a song by them at all. As such, thank you for being the first fan to send in a request for BTS, and of course, thank you for sharing your enthusiasm for the song. I will be looking forward to reviewing the song.

However, for bad news to share, I will have to most likely delay this review due to “technical” issues. Specifically, there is no “clean” audio as of yet since with the music video, the audio is paused for quite some time before resuming towards the middle. Now of course I could always rely on non-official videos–examples being audio or lyrics videos–but I prefer to use a reviewed artist’s official videos. Perhaps a dance practice might work or, for the best outcome, a choreography version as that certainly includes both dance and clean audio. Until then, though, this request might be delayed until I can figure this out. Most likely, I will link the music video, a live performance or dance practice, and then an audio video if no other source has a “clean” audio.

Either way, definitely look forward to this review to come. I will attempt to review it by, at most, a week. Realistically, though, expect it to come in three or four days. Thanks again for the request!

Crayon Pop  – “Doo Doom Chit” Review

(Dance
Practice)

Crayon Pop – Doo
Doom Chit

Reviewed
on October 9, 2016

The post-choruses, for example, are more accurately labeled as chanting versus actual singing. Likewise, the choruses’ singing may be playful as noticed by the echoing “whoa,” but there is no complex, strenuous forms of singing in the choruses.

Personal Message:
I currently have ten songs, this
current review included, that are due for reviews. For a scale, bear in mind
that I tend to cover usually six songs per month.
This is quite a daunting task, is it not? But of course, rather than viewing
reviews as a game of quantity, I always attempt to strive for quality.

In terms of other news, I have
finally begun writing for Hyuna’s review of “How’s This?” and hope to post the
review soon. It has surprisingly been quite a while since I have brought in a
social topic (the last one was with Fiestar’s “Apple Pie” on the unseen
complexity of feminism
),
but Hyuna will finally be a return of those discussions for readers who are
equally engaged in a sociological (and literary lenses) take to K-Pop. And of
course, the musical discussion involved will be equally thought-provoking or
plainly emotionally provoking. Overall, though, the main purpose of bringing in
these social topics is, in addition to the idea that these topics should be
addressed directly, I hope to complicate situations in order to reveal that
many social discussions are far from simple. Specifically with Hyuna’s review,
the topic of “double standards” is one that is actually not clear-cut, and yet
people remain too adamant on their stances and forget to look more critically.
To leak where that review will lead the discussion, readers should bear in mind
that “double standards” is not, for example, “feminazi” at work but likewise
that “double standards” still does carry inequality at times. Again, there is
far too much to discuss and thus, I encourage interested readers to look out
for that review. Plus, fans of that song should equally stay tuned; I will be
respectfully critiquing the song rather harshly.

Digressions aside, let us turn our
attention to the ladies who should have been with us from the start: Crayon Pop.
Although I have definitely been familiar with the group’s name—and more
specifically, their group image of wearing adorable bicycle helmets—I have yet
to listen to a song by them. As such, with their comeback song, “Doo Doom
Chit,” it provided me a chance to finally hear them and to likewise review
their song. For what I will say about “Doo Doom Chit” on a personal level, it
is the first song that has actually made me laugh while listening to it—in a
good way, of course. It truly is a lighthearted, comical song and furthermore is
very catchy. Even Red Velvet’s “Russian Roulette” loses its throne of being the
catchiest song I have heard when compared to “Doo Doom Chit” ‘s catchiness.

That said, and perfectly timed with
mentioning Red Velvet, unfortunately the same issues that I critiqued in
“Russian Roulette” applies here: catchiness is, in my opinion, inadequate as a
reason to use for qualifying a song as good. (For readers desiring to know why I make that claim in the first place—that
“catchiness” is stylistic and not a qualifying point—please feel free to refer
to the linked review.) With that in mind, let us take a closer hearing to “Doo
Doom Chit.”

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 5/10
(4.50/10 raw score) – “Average”


Vocals: 4/10


Sections: 5/10
(4.63/10 raw score)

Introduction, Post-Chorus,
Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Rap, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge,
Chorus, Conclusion (Post-Chorus)

1.     Introduction:
4/10

2.     Verse: 6/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 5/10

4.     Chorus: 3/10

5.     Post-Chorus: 4/10

6.     Rap: 5/10

7.     Bridge: 5/10

8.     Conclusion (Post-Chorus): 5/10


Instrumental: 6/10


Lyrics: 3/10

C.R.A.Y.O.N
Pop

Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit
Shake it shake it shake it, ha
Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit

Why are you so quiet today?
I’m here, you should be getting loud

(Put your hands up)
Hands up to the left
To the right
Scream like you’re crazy
Shake it, doo doom chit
(Boom boom boom boom)
From your head to your toes
Run, run, let’s run
Like this

Oh baby whoa
Follow me
Whoa, oh doo doom chit
My dear, whoa
Look at me
Baby, baby, baby
I’m so fantastic, girl

Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit
Shake it shake it shake it, ha
Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit

Yeah, it’s wide open
Confidently go on stage
Even if they make fun of us,
just dance and enjoy tonight, shall we?
Move to the sound of my pounding heart: one-two step
Even my silky hair looks good
Dancing queen

Hands up to the left
To the right
Scream like you’re crazy
Shake it, doo doom chit
(Boom boom boom boom)
From your head to your toes
Run, run, let’s run
Like this

Oh baby whoa
Follow me
Whoa, oh doo doom chit
My dear, whoa
Look at me
Baby, baby, baby
I’m so fantastic, girl

What do I do?
My heart is getting fuzzy and ticklish
Are you ready, are you ready?
Turn up the volume

Oh baby whoa
Follow me
Whoa, oh doo doom chit
My dear, whoa
Look at me
Baby, baby, baby
I’m so fantastic, girl

Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit
Shake it shake it shake it, ha
Doo doom chit
Doo doom chit, doom chit, doom chit

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: Slightly
reiterating the focus of this review, rather than the usual route of covering a
song in of itself, for this review I wish to focus more on how its catchiness—while
superficially appealing—provides more negatives than positives if we look
critically at the song’s composition. Once we look past the catchiness, as the
ratings reveal, “Doo Doom Chit” is only average—and at that, it is nearly “slightly below average” (a
four). Reminders aside, let us take a look at some of the negatives brought on
by orientating the song towards “catchiness.”

One
category that is greatly impaired would be the lyrics. Understandably, as this
song is focused on being upbeat, cheerful and the like, the song’s lyrics have
to reflect such. Unfortunately, though, in reflecting the song’s tone, that
means the song has to recycle almost meaningless phrases: “Hands up to the left
/ To the right”; “Shake it shake it shake it”’; and, for the song’s iconic
phrase, “Doo doom chit”—of which contains no meaning minus, if correct,
referencing a “dancing cat meme.” In other words, while the lyrics are indeed
fun and rather comical—after all, as said, the whole basis of the song is on a
dancing cat meme—in terms of actual substance and a plethora of details, “Doo
Doom Chit” ‘s lyrics fall quite short. Certainly the lyrics are catchy and
every listener, regardless of knowing Korean or not, can easily chant to “doo
doom chit,” but once again, if we dive more critically the lyrics truly are
meaningless and that is where my critique lies.

As
for the more sonic-related criticism, the vocals, instrumental, and sections
are all equally weakened by the “catchiness”—though the instrumental might
actually benefit in some ways. With the vocals, while Crayon Pop showcases
impressive moments such as the first and only verse and the pre-choruses,
unfortunately the other sections completely contradict those moments. That said,
this is not to say the ladies lack vocal skills; if the prior sentence is not
clear, it is the song’s structure predominantly at fault, not skill per se. Clarifying
what I mean, the sections besides the verse and pre-choruses are the ones that
lower the vocals’ quality. The post-choruses, for example, are more accurately labeled
as chanting versus actual singing. Likewise, the choruses’ singing may be
playful as noticed by the echoing “whoa,” but there is no complex, strenuous
forms of singing in the choruses. It is, as in the post-choruses, chanting and
that is insufficient for a higher vocal rating. And on top of this all, many of
the sections—most notably and as partially revealed, the choruses and
post-choruses—are lacking. Certainly all are catchy, but again, catchiness does
not equate to “good” necessarily. For example, the post-choruses’ repeating of “doo
doom chit” while being backed up by a hastier, bass-heavy instrumental and
seducing saxophone creates a sense that the sections are in fact excellent, but
in reality, there is little complexity involved. Instead, I argue the sound of
all of these factors merely work well together, but that is just that; there is
no further workings that make the post-choruses’ incredibly impressive besides
putting certain sounds together and getting a good result.

All
in all, while a five is not a distinctive score, it certainly is not a “negative”
one in terms of falling under average. Even then, “Doo Doom Chit” hardly makes
it into the “average” range. Nonetheless, even with harsher critiques given
here, we must remember in the end that, for this song’s particular goal—the goal
of in fact being catchy and having fun—it does an amazing job at just that. “Doo
Doom Chit” was never meant for heavy scrutiny: it was meant to be a generic,
fun and exciting pop song. My critique is to challenge the views that claim “Doo
Doom Chit” is a rather solid, strong song. Once again, I disagree that it is a
higher holding song, but even so, it is one of the most fun songs I have heard.

Overall,
this review should not be interpreted as a message of claiming Crayon Pop is a
musically weak group or that the producers and composers involved with “Doo
Doom Chit” are unknowledgeable—after all, it takes much knowledge to make a song catchy at all. This review instead is
to highlight that the catchiness involved, while taking much effort and
knowledge, is nothing extraordinary if comparing some other songs where, for example,
there are composition decisions—both subtle and obvious—that significantly impact
a song for the better and goes beyond the point of just getting a phrase
trapped in a listener’s head. And so, though on a serious level I find “Doo
Doom Chit” another generic pop song, I still very much encourage supporting
Crayon Pop. (In fact, with Soyul having to pause activities due to her anxiety
disorder, I would argue Crayon Pop deserves even more support.) Nothing is
wrong with focusing more on fun, catchy songs—after all, some can very much
score well despite an upbeat tone. And of course, all artists deserve much respect
and support for their hard work.

_______________________________________________________

As
usual, thank you to all for reading or skimming the review. For an update, I
will be having a one-week break and, besides getting ahead on school work, I
will use the break to equally catch up on reviews. In terms of the next review,
look forward to Hyuna’s “How’s This?” and afterwards Shinee’s “1 of 1”—this song
being one I am super excited to review.

Until
then, to end with my signature closure of quoting songs since I still have no
actual closure, let us “just dance and enjoy tonight, shall we?” This makes no
sense whatsoever, but given the lyrics to the song, please just accept it. Look
forward to Hyuna’s review.

Infinite – “The Eye” Review

(Music Video) / (Live Performance)

Infinite – The Eye

Reviewed
on October 5, 2016

image

This explanation is very much lacking as arguably all pop songs follow this form in one way or another, but the distinction I wish to draw on is that “The Eye” is predominantly interested in the hyping—the “building up”—aspect of the song’s progression. Is that a benefit or detriment? In this review, I argue it is both and hence why many might be flustered over whether “The Eye” is a solid release or not.

Personal Message:
It has been, as of this sentence,
nine or so days since the last review. Furthermore, it is already a new month:
October. Due to the many essays I have been writing, reviews have sadly become
delayed. Nonetheless, I hope readers understand and to that I would like to
thank readers for being patient. For other news, as some might have noticed,
the links have been revised so that they are less redundant; rather than
listing each link on its own separate line and repeating the artist and song
name, it is now simply “(Music Video) / (Dance Practice)” or whatever is
appropriate. Nothing significant, but these minor changes towards helping
improving the blog in any form—content and aesthetics—are always welcomed.  

On topic with Infinite and their
recent comeback, while I do not review choreographies anymore (and rightfully
so; I lack the analytical skills for such), I strongly recommend readers to
watch the linked live performance (or if in the far future, then the dance
practice). Infinite is very much recognized for their dancing and “The Eye” is
no exception. I would even go as far as claiming this is their best
choreography as of yet. Of course, though, for our purposes, let us focus on
the song itself. From my knowledge, current views of “The Eye” are a mix: some
fans greatly praise the song; some fans find it mediocre but that it contains
Infinite’s signature sound; and some fans find the song to lean moreover the
weaker side and is not “Infinite-like.” In other words, there is currently no
main take to the song. In terms of where I will argue where the song stands, I
actually believe that the current mixtures of opinions are rather accurate:
“The Eye” is a convoluted song in the sense that it contains many impressive
points, and yet, it is still lacking at other points. Let us now dive right
into the eye of the song.

_______________________________________________________

Song Score: 6/10
(6.00/10 raw score) – “Slightly above average”


Vocals: 7/10


Sections: 5/10
(5.17/10 raw score)

Introduction, Verse,
Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Conclusion
(Post-Chorus)

1.     Introduction:
4/10

2.     Verse: 6/10

3.     Pre-Chorus: 6/10

4.     Chorus: 6/10

5.     Post-Chorus: 5/10

6.     Conclusion (Post-Chorus): 4/10


Instrumental: 6/10


Lyrics: 6/10

[Instrumental]

It’s all over, I forgot it all
Finally, I’ve erased you
It was so long, it was so hard
But I’m saying goodbye to this break up
It has all ended, it has all stopped
Finally, light is coming down
The stormy rain and wind
Has finally stopped but

Your memories
Wrap around me again
Even when I take one step
I get drenched with you
The place I left you
The place I ran away from
It’s the center of my memories of you
I finally realize

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
The fate that has remained with me
I try to escape from you
I try to run far away
But I’m swept up by you again

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
These feelings that I still have
I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you
With eyes filled with sin
I’m trapped in your eyes
Trapped

You were so beautiful
We were so happy
In your memories
In the light of the memories
I think I could live

But I don’t think I can do this again
I don’t think I can pierce through you and leave
In your photo
I’m reflected in those eyes
I still can’t do anything
So I’m crying

Your eyes, your face
They sweep me up again
You fall as rain that are like prison bars
Closing up my heart

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
The fate that has remained with me
I try to escape from you
I try to run far away
But I’m swept up by you again

After a break up that hasn’t ended
I’m saying goodbye to this break up
These feelings that I still have
I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you
With eyes filled with sin
I’m trapped in your eyes
Trapped

_______________________________________________________

Analysis: To
note, this will most likely be a faster review given how busy I am (and that
there are many songs to catch up on). If possible, I will finish this review in
two paragraphs at most.

Onto
the review, “The Eye” holds at a six which is still a decent score. That said,
though, in comparison to past releases such as the much older ones of “Last
Romeo” and “The Chaser” (which I have reviewed), it is slightly weaker if we
judge from a numerical context. For what we will be focusing on in specific, I
believe the reason for “The Eye” ‘s mixture of opinions would be in how its
main strength is actually its  main
weakness: the structuring of the song—in other words, how the song’s
progression is formed.

Clarifying
what I mean with the term “progression,” I am referring to how the song
essentially flows. In a very rudimentary explanation of “The Eye” ‘s
progression—again, realize there is much
more involved, and of which I hope to cover later—the song heavily focuses on
building up to the climaxes—in this case, the choruses—and from there, it
repeats this cycle. This explanation is very much lacking as arguably all pop
songs follow this form in one way or another, but the distinction I wish to
draw on is that “The Eye” is predominantly interested in the hyping—the “building up”—aspect of the
song’s progression. Is that a benefit or detriment? In this review, I argue it
is both and hence why many might be flustered over whether “The Eye” is a solid
release or not. With all this hopefully clarified and in mind, let us look into
the effects of this emphasized “hyping.”

Focusing
first on the vocals, the hyping-orientated take very much strengthens the
vocals—or more accurately, it diversifies
the vocals. Consider the vocals in an overarching view: from the very
beginning, Infinite’s slower, passive, and lower singing is showcased. However,
“The Eye” begins to pick up much quickly from here and soon, the vocals
progress to a much hastier pacing and likewise notes begin to equally escalate
along with intensity. Eventually, the climaxes occur—which, as said, are the
choruses—and from here a more direct, powerful approach is taken with Infinite’s
vocals. In summary, then, because “The Eye” is structured in a form that cares
less of the end—the climactic choruses—and more on the path to getting there,
listeners are exposed a multitude of vocal styles, intensities, pacing, and so
forth. As a result, the vocals become appealing due to that variety. On top of
that all, though, is that the actual execution holds well. It is more than just
variety at play; the men excellently cover the transitioning points, are
tuneful and harmonious among one another, and appropriately match their vocals
to the song’s state (hyping, climax, etc.). Adding to this, the instrumental
follows a similar route and many of the mentioned points would equally apply to
it.

The
downside to this all, however, is the emphasis towards hyping creates problems
for the sections—but understandably so. Right from the start, listeners might
notice the introduction is potentially dragged; it appears excessive in length
and yet does not necessarily establish the song’s overall tone and style. Even
if the song’s emotional tone is established—a solemn tone—on a musical sense,
one cannot foresee if the song would take the form of a ballad or an upbeat pop
song. Regardless, the main critique to point to is the length; the
establishment of tone and so forth is not as significant as the introduction itself
taking extra seconds despite already setting up the song (and again, of which I
argue is not precise). Other moments for where the emphasized hyping is
problematic would be towards the post-choruses and the conclusion. The
post-choruses in “The Eye” are meant for recycling the song’s progression so
that it can begin anew with a slower, calmer start, but unfortunately the post-choruses
fulfilled that role somewhat poorly. In some aspects, the post-choruses
actually increase the intensity versus just gradually decreasing it—this being
a contradicting flow if considering how “The Eye” needs a proper resetting for
its specific hyping style to work. Nonetheless, given the quick and sharp ends
to them, they are still functional; the issue, then, is that they are not
necessarily efficient at their roles.

“The
Eye” is overall still an impressive song, however. It may reach an impressive,
superb standard, but it nevertheless holds decently. Certainly, the men’s
vocals continue to shine due to the song’s focus on hyping and that, while some
issues occurred with that very focus, I personally appreciate the song’s unique
decision of that. It has been a while since I last heard a song where the
building-up—the hyping—is more focused than on its climactic points. This is
also why the producer(s)’ decision to not include a bridge is wonderful: a
bridge would not have fit the song and would have very much counteracted the
song’s main emphasis. All in all,  “The
Eye” may not be Infinite’s strongest song, but it may be one of Infinite’s more
unique ones and absolutely the dancing involved—even if not musical per se—is
the song’s best asset.

_______________________________________________________

Again,
I apologize to readers for not posting content for a while. On the positive
side, I will have a break soon and plan to catch up during that. As said,
though, university comes first but know that, even if not writing, I am
constantly doing the analytical work of reviews ahead of time. And that I have
recently been binge-watching Apink and now have a huge idol crush on Eunji who
is also very much my “ideal type” along with SPICA’s Boa but this is all irrelevant news. Imagine the last sentence being
said in an accelerated way. Jokes aside, I will work on reviewing Hyuna’s “How’s
This?” soon and with that to finally have a social discussion (it has been months
since the last if correct), and from there to then review Crayon Pop’s “Doo
Doom Chit.”

Until
then, “I can’t forget you, I can’t erase you.” Look forward to whichever review
comes first.

My friend, I would like to know how to upload the videos without being striked or blocked for copyrights, could you please tell me?

– 

Naith Orlain

Originally answered on YouTube. I am sharing it here for a wider audience as I think Naith’s question resonates with many K-Pop fans who desire to share videos of idols–and of which Naith is doing for Fiestar:

“Great question. I might actually write a blog post regarding this to cover in depth. (Edit: Or better yet will copy and paste this. Apologies for the long answer.) I do have a few tips, though, that I can give here. After losing my first channel, I personally developed a few guidelines. My tips are as follows, but be aware these tips are with the mindset and experience of subtitling (and of course with Korean media). (I have no knowledge when it comes to, say, remixing songs/videos, etc. If these are moreover your questions of copyright, personal research should be done and more so as that is much more serious than subtitling.) 

 First, realize there are technically two forms of copyright: “Instant” and “Delayed.” If you upload something and it gets instantly blocked (it’ll say something like “Blocked: World”), you will be fine. This means the content you are uploading cannot be worked around and should not be uploaded; attempting to do so via resizing the resolution or shifting audio balance and pitch are short-solutions that will eventually be caught and therefore a strike. But, if you abide to the “Instant” strike, you actually receive no penalty. Just don’t risk further actions. 

Now a “Delayed” copyright strike is one that hits out-the-blues. There is honestly nothing to do if this occurs, unfortunately–but, there are ways to avoid this as much as possible. To avoid this, use this general guideline: if the official video is the ONLY source, then most likely it means everyone else is getting copyright blocked. For example, I personally have wanted to upload GFriend’s Yuju’s cover of “Speak Now” (originally by Taylor Swift). Interestingly, I saw no one upload it yet and I decided to do so in hopes of finally being the person who took the initiative. Unfortunately, it was an “Instant” copyright block. On the other hand, upon checking the official video where Yuju sang, it truly was the only one up and thus, that should’ve told me I shouldn’t have gone further. 

Now you may ask: “What about the worst-case scenario with videos where everyone has been uploading a video without problems (for a true example, videos where idols have modeled for Maxim), and then out of nowhere EVERYONE gets a copyright strike?” Sadly, nothing can be done but to keep track of “copyright-prone” videos–examples being Maxim, We Got Married, Immortal Songs 2, and much more. With strikes, in my opinion, if you find yourself with even one, I would–if you have not done so already–backup your videos and prepare a backup channel if need be. Always have room for a “out-of-the-blue” copyright strike. And remember, in six months, it resets a single strike. (If you have two, it’s one year.) 

Overall, the only solution I have discovered so far is, if uploading a copyright-prone video, go for minimal length. For example, I personally have uploaded two video cuts from We Got Married and both of which are still here. Why? Because both are only ten seconds. Also, the only way to be truly at ease is, in Video Manager, check to see if copyright owners have given you explicit permission to use it. This is the ONLY certain way to know that a video will never get a strike. For example, MBC is very open–minus a few shows–with letting fans upload their videos. Many of Fiestar’s interviews are from MBC, but they have given me permission to use the videos as long as they can monetize it. Likewise LOEN Entertainment, Fiestar’s label, has been open with me as well with using their videos as long as I accept them monetizing it. 

Depending on what you are trying to upload, it may or may not be possible. The biggest tip is to never push copyright; never attempt to sneak around it via audio pitch changes and so forth. And at the end of the day, realize copyright blocking exists for a reason: to respect appropriate artists, companies, etc. While I still dread Maxim’s video of Fiestar being the strike that took down my first channel even though I had uploaded it months ago, I ultimately respect their choice of them wanting to keep the video on their own channel.

This is a very long answer to a simple question, but I hope this provides you–and others–a simple yet thorough guide on how copyright blocking works on YouTube (with Korean media in specific). 

 – Will be posted on my blog for others to reference.”