4Minute – “Crazy” Review

4Minute – Crazy (Live Performance)

4Minute – Crazy

Reviewed on March 1, 2015

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Personal Message: 4Minute’s comeback was one I planned to cover for quite a while, but due to time restraints and other work, it was delayed. Nevertheless, I will now cover their recent return of “Crazy.” To already address the link, it is a standard live performance, and as a result, for those who desire full clarity, searching for the official audio will provide that. Thankfully, though, the dance is disclosed (though for future readers, a potential dance practice might become released). For other news, despite February being a much shorter month, chances of meeting my personal goal of 6 reviews may be possible after all. But, of course, determination will be the deciding factor.

Focusing on 4Minute, I have reviewed their previous song of “Whatcha Doin’ Today,” and besides recalling how atrocious my review was archaic work, this provides a chance to see some growth and change by contrasting the two reviews. Even though skimming over that review gives a tremendous sense of embarrassment, in the far future, should I ever glance back at this review, I hope the same feeling of shame returns. Continuing to improve is always in mind.  

Now, to be truly on topic with 4Minute (feel free to skip straight to the review at this point), their current song of “Crazy” has been garnering a solid amount of popularity. The concept for this song is rather indescribable, but to vaguely breach the surface, fierceness, boldness, and confidence are summarizing adjectives for the song. Many have enjoyed this style, and in fact, according to 4Minute themselves, they have noticed that female fans, in specific, are the ones that have been going “Crazy” over their concept. Of course, there may be readers that find that irrelevant, but I will bring my opinion on why I find it beneficial that 4Minute’s female fans, and plain female viewers, are taking pride in their comeback. Bringing in an effective, transparent example as for why that matters, let us first address a common criticism that exists against 4Minute’s current concept: too much makeup.

Before revealing how 4Minute’s comeback combats that prevalent comment and significantly more, first, I will offer my own take on it. Though the remark of critiquing 4Minute’s stage appearances may be considered miniscule due to the idea of how they are idols or since it is simply offering opinion on style, there is a much greater danger to such; consistent, heavy, and ubiquitous judgement on the group’s appearances reinforce multiple negative mindsets, be it emphasis and value on purely physical appearance, but more vitally, the idea of policing females becomes unveiled (if 4Minute were males in the first place, much of the criticism regarding appearances would cease; refer to my review on Hyorin’s x Jooyoung’s “Erase” for a miniscule example). Taking a more critical stance, one must ask who is predominantly commenting on the group’s “excessive makeup,” and in truth, the general person to do such is most likely a boy. However, bear in mind, even if males are the ones mainly remarking such, it is true that ladies can still be equally guilty, even if less in quantity (later I will explain this).

Referring back to why a simple mere comment of “too much makeup” can induce a hefty of damage, if boys are truly the ones creating those comments, rather than defending their right to make remarks on a lady’s physical appearance, it is better to challenge why they deserve that right in the first place. Male privilege, and more clearly, sexism, comes into play, but before progressing any further, I will address this possible refute: “But females can critique a male’s look just as much.” Blatantly, both genders can, and do, critique one another’s appearance. While that contributes to the described issue of emphasis towards physical beauty (to save time, refer to my review of Juniel’s “I Think I’m In Love” for the beauty-related issue side), there is a very noteworthy disparity: males are more often the ones to do the judging, and thus, in that regard, they set the standards for how females should dress, but furthermore, in reverse, no beauty standard is ever set for them; seldom is a boy told to be “pretty” (but of course, there are still exceptions; some men are told and expected to be pretty). After all, recall the many day-to-day examples that have become, sadly, normalized and solely aimed towards ladies; females are told to “smile,” to “not get dirty,” and more. Now addressing the earlier piece of how a few ladies may be the ones to actually impose such comments, such as the previous two examples, this ties into another concept: internalizing sexism. The main idea of how males police and control females for the sake of themselves are not necessarily always imposed by males, but occasionally, and more accurately worded, once again, sadly, commonly, females have internalized that concept as well, and as a result, impose it onto other females.

Anyhow, since I have introduced too many concepts, let us focus back to the main, initial argument of why critiquing 4Minute for having “too much makeup” is exponentially negative. Ignoring the side of valuing sole physical beauty versus non-physical beauty, the idea I wish to challenge is how males tend to be the sole-center for everything. In an androcentric society, such as this case, the fallout of such is seen through this sheer comment of “too much makeup.” The main reason for why a boy would create that comment is, despite whether this reason is realized or not, they dislike the style. They dislike the excessive makeup since they prefer lighter makeup on ladies. They also dislike it when a lady dresses up in a certain way but not another, they also dislike it when a lady styles her hair in a certain way but not another, they also dislike it when a lady succeeds them and is smarter. Point is, that sole line, that single, seemingly harmless line of “I dislike it when 4Minute has too much makeup,” is the invisible, subtle privilege given to males that allows them to have, and to perpetuate, control and power over females, and in this specific case, control of females’ physical appearances. A male (or female) saying that comment is, in essence, claiming 4Minute’s appearance is not appealing, yet it should be pleasing, for males’ sake and enjoyment. For them. Again, the male-centered idea and concept is the catalyst for this comment, hence why it is extremely negative as it implies females should be set and held to the standard of males, as if females were purely dolls versus the incredible, beautiful, intelligent, and highly talented humans they truly are.

Assuming readers have not skipped this section or swore at my name and wished for my life span to be shortened, I will bring in some positivity. Firstly, while I targeted, and truthfully, nearly antagonized males, I do not want to correlate my previous words so that every male is guilty on an individual level. In fact, in truth, as long as one is a male, these hidden privileges are in place and unfair advantages are created. It is not the individual person at fault, but rather, a society and a system to blame (and the side of how ladies can also be equally guilty of the criticizing and therefore contributing to this issue). Also, if a person has made a comment, male or female, I am not here to insult and degrade perpetrators; rather than shaming and embarrassing, I believe a more vital and important scenario is possible. For readers who have commented on 4Minute’s or other ladies, men, whoever, for their physical appearance, be it makeup or fashion, this is a chance to simply self reflect and to improve from mistakes. Instead of shutting down and avoiding guilt, taking time to address and correct is highly more efficient, and in the long run, more meaningful. With all of this said, bear in mind, this is a very specific angle in which I personally viewed this issue from. I am certain that another person is in high disagreement, and in fact, many probably are. After all, some may simply claim I am being overly critical and sensitive towards a very genuine feedback on 4Minute’s makeup. Every opinion is worthy of acknowledgement, and thus, my point is not to necessarily convince readers to adopt my mindset, but rather, I hope to offer a new perspective, one in which agree or disagreement may occur.

Anyhow, to relate back to the much earlier claim of why 4Minute’s comeback is highly popular, especially with female fans and viewers, whether intended or not, this comeback, in many ways, bestows a large amount of confidence to females in terms of challenging restrictions placed upon them. For one example, the idea of “too much makeup” is challenged as, blatantly, the 5 ladies are styled with such and showcasing how physically and non-physically beautiful they are with such. Also, as mentioned, and without going on another discussion (I will actually save this for my upcoming review if I remember), the concept of “Crazy” is seldom given to female groups; male groups are often time the one given an upfront, intimidating style, and even the style of music with the heavier bass, fierce rapping and such are reserved for males. However, in 4Minute’s case, that trend becomes challenged as they are indeed handling a concept that is rarely seen for female groups (and in the past, even “What’s Your Name,” though significantly less in degree, is a concept that contests the norms).

Hopefully readers were not repelled away, and for future references I will do a better job of restraining myself (though I do not believe in avoiding topics). With progressing after perhaps the most loquacious Personal Message section I have ever written, it is time to begin the review. While “Crazy” has, certainly, been making ladies and men going “Crazy” over their new song, in truth, this is one of 4Minute’s weaker releases. Although I do biasedly adore the concept, and in some aspects, the song itself as well, when deconstructing the song in a systematic fashion, “Crazy,” in reality, is not too solid at all. In my case, it certainly drives me “Crazy.”

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Song Total Score: 5/10 (4.6/10 raw score)

– Vocals: 6/10 – The vocals in this song are inconsistent, but not in a negative implication; rapping sections and plain singing sections are distinctively different. Although their past song of “Whatcha Doin’ Today” possessed both singing and rapping, the two styles were still akin, yet in “Crazy,” that is not the case. Nevertheless, despite the disparity that exists in the current song, on the structural level, the contrast provided augments the song. Rapping sections possess more of their ferocity and power, and in opposite, the singing that does occur comes off as exceptionally melodic and soft. Diversity and proper contrast exists due to the differences. In terms of whether the vocals are sound mechanically, yes, vocals are indeed a form of sound the skills from the ladies prove to be excellent. Gayoon and Sohyun provided excellent singing that showcased excellent melody, and especially with Gayoon, power. For the rappers, Hyuna and Jiyoon continue their streak of being a highly talented rapping duo; both ladies unveiled fantastic pacing, melody, and to fit the tone of “Crazy,” a heavy, strong and impactful presence is given. Now, while the rapping and singing are solid, exceptionally prominent issues exist: the vocals at the choruses, and for those who noticed the missing member, Jihyun’s part, are not too solid. Firstly, the choruses possess very chaotic vocals (more in-depth later), let alone the layout itself. As for Jihyun, while in the past solid vocals have been disclosed, for what is presented in “Crazy,” her part remains lacking in a multitude of perspectives, though specifically with the vocals, the singing is extremely lacking.

Overall, the vocals hold at only slightly above average. Individually, excluding Jiyoon, every member offers outstanding vocals. However, when factoring in the choruses, a major component of the song, and Jihyun’s weaker bridge, the score will be lowered.

– Song Structure: 5/10 (4.86/10 raw score)

The song goes in this structure and order:

Introduction, Rap, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Rap, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Conclusion (Chorus)

1. Introduction: 5/10 – Hyuna and Jiyoon handle the introduction.

Conceptually, the introduction is solid. Ignoring that side, however, in terms of how it sounds, the introduction does suffer significantly. Firstly, in terms of the concept and layout, the rate at which it developed is suiting; the introduction hastily sets up the song’s overall energetic state, and thus, boldness becomes reiterated. Additionally, the “Crazy” concept is further constructed via Hyuna’s and Jiyoon’s lines. Both members neither sing or rap, but rather, they simply offer statements. Due to a more upfront approach, the concept itself is further developed in terms of boldness, confidence, and such. Focusing on the musical side, while the introduction perfectly sets the atmosphere for the song, the downfall, unfortunately, is seen by the lack of a more enticing musical aspect. Vocally, the duo’s lines are not captivating due to being regular spoken lines versus sung or rapped ones. For the instrumental, it remains equally dull; a lighter beat is utilized and its rate progressively quickens, but nothing else occurs beyond that. Furthermore, the beats themselves were not appealing.

Overall, average will be the score. The structure is efficient and excellent, but when accounting for what is sacrificed to grant that structure, the introduction results poorly and becomes heavily one-sided. An introduction should be mechanically and structurally captivating, but in “Crazy” ‘s case, solely the structure holds.

2. Rap: 6/10 – As expected, the ladies of Hyuna and Jiyoon handle the rapping sections. Hyuna is responsible for the first and Jiyoon for the second. I will be accounting for both their raps.

Addressing the rapping sections’ sonic component, with the rappers being highly adept, minimal issues exist. With Hyuna’s rap specifically, it contains practically every main component to a solid rap; a rhythmic melody exists, a prominent presence is felt, and most promisingly, her pacing remains exceptionally fluent and hasty which, in long-term, complements the given melody. In terms of Hyuna’s rap layout, repetition is utilized. For 4 lines, similar ending exists, and while in general this would create staleness, due to the style of the rap, the opposite occurs: it is beneficial. Chemistry occurs between multiple aspects due to the repetition; with 4 nearly identical line endings, the same consistency there reflects the beats, and as a result, the sonic aspect is aided in that the melody carries an exceptionally rhymatic tune.

Swapping to Jiyoon’s rap, it unfortunately does falter in comparison to Hyuna’s. Addressing the positive side first, the structure of her rap is decent. Coming after the chorus, a relatively less energetic section, to provide a solid transition for the more energetic upcoming sections, Jiyoon’s rap would need to provide a proper escalation. In this case, it is successful. The instrumental and rap grant that escalation via quickening, light beats, and from the rap itself, a surge of power. Now, in terms of the rap’s own structure, it leans toward being plain. The alternation between Korean and English provide a layer of contrast, and towards the end, the names of locations allow heavier, slower pauses, but overall, nothing of the structure proves to be supportive towards the rap’s biggest flaw: its sonic aspect. Unlike Hyuna’s rap that excelled in this category, Jiyoon’s rapping, while skill is blatantly disclosed, fails to be infatuating. Power is the rap’s sole strong point, but even then, it is the catalyst for why the rap is poorer; excessive emphasis placed on being impactful drains every other component of the rap: the flow could have significantly been smoother, the pacing could have hastened to reciprocate the instrumental’s beats, and more pressingly, the melody lacked. Despite impressive power given, when lacking these other crucial factors, the rap as a whole suffers.

Overall, with Hyuna’s rap holding an 7 and Jiyoon’s being a 5, averaging the two will result in a 6. Therefore, slightly above average will still be the score for the rap sections in summary. Though both ladies possess a high level of rapping talent, Jiyoon’s part will impair the score, but at least in opposite, Hyuna’s rap compensates slightly.

3. Verse: 6/10 – Sohyun is responsible for the two verses in “Crazy.”

Focusing on the verses’ sound, as the recurring statement seems to be, the individual skill appears, however, the sound itself is not too solid once multiple layers are accounted. Sohyun’s singing follows a higher pitched and melodic style. In fact, even some fragments of power are added. Now, while her tune is not necessarily negative, her singing lacks depth; the same melody is recycled for a total of 3, and even with the break that occurs near the middle, that varying line does not redeem the lack of diversity, and further, the varying line itself sounds poor sonically as it is moreover a statement than singing. Peering at the verses from a structural lens, the mechanical singing lacking variety might derive from the structure; homogenous to the singing lacking variety, the structure follows suit. The first two and final lines are practically identical, and thus, the only differing line occurs towards the middle. Unlike Hyuna’s rap that benefits from repetition, such as amplified power and flow, in the verses’ case, the opposite holds true: due to a slower and melodic approach, repetition drags out the verses’ tune rather than augmenting it.

Overall, slightly above average will hold as the score. Sohyun’s singing is not bad, and in certain ways, it is rather delightful, but once the lack of variety, both mechanically and structurally, is accounted for, the section does languish.

4. Pre-Chorus: 7/10 – Gayoon handles both the pre-choruses.

Being 4Minute’s main vocalist, Gayoon proves why she possesses that role. Mechanically, the pre-choruses are definitely respectable. Gayoon’s vocals showcase many layers: a fluctuating and pleasing melody, a slightly diverse range of notes, and adding on, stunning power. Being more specific, for the melody, unlike prior sections such as the rap and even the verse where the melodies remained relatively stagnant, during the pre-choruses, the tune remains dynamic; every line possessed its own melody and no recycling of melodies occurred. As for the notes, similar to the melody, the range of utilized pitches remain equally diverse; lower notes are used initially, but much higher notes are heard towards the later part of the pre-choruses. In terms of power, Gayoon brings forth exceptionally impacting lines, though the true beauty resides moreover in the progression than in how her powerful lines themselves sound.

On that note, for the pre-choruses’ structure, it is effective, but it lacks in remaining unique. With the role of a pre-chorus, creating hype for the chorus is its standardized task. Although that goal is met, the executed method to do so is not efficient. Firstly, however, to elaborate on why its role is still satisfied, the progression can be seen as the main reason.. A gradual and natural pacing becomes manipulated to create hype; a slower, calmer start becomes accelerated due to the beats, and vocally, Gayoon’s singing contributes as it becomes more intense via more power and higher notes. Now, because of this structure, the build-up effect is felt, however, while it grants the desired outcome, the method is exceptionally mundane. Beats quickening and even the vocals following a linear path of increasing power are extremely basic procedures, and while it may be pleasing mechanically, especially with Gayoon’s singing, from a structural viewpoint, it is not enticing.  

Overall, due to the sheer musical component being exceptionally pleasing, despite the structural component remaining lacking and unembellished, the pre-choruses will still hold a score of above average.

5. Chorus: 3/10 – For the choruses, Hyuna handles the first and last, and Jiyoon the second.

The choruses, admittedly, accomplish their goals from the concept’s perspective; the “Crazy” theme is definitely given, and more accurately phrased, ingrained into listeners. Ignoring that piece and focusing on the more important parts of mechanical and structural, both parties are heavily defective. For the chorus’ structure, though initial moments vary from the main body of the chorus, it is practically solely one line repeated: “Like you’re crazy” (but in Korean). Attempts to create variety is seen towards the beginning, but with that remaining nearly identical to the main body, minus spelling out “crazy” letter by letter, it still fails. Furthermore, considering the choruses run at a relatively sluggish rate, with the same key phrase repeating 7 times in that pacing, it becomes significantly dragged out, and thus, even more vexing. Regarding the sonic piece, no stellar singing or rapping occurred; in fact, no singing or rapping occurred at all. The choruses are conducted as simple speech, though an aggressive and bold nature are added to suit the atmosphere. Nevertheless, while lacking musically-orientated vocals is not directly bad (in certain cases, not singing is extremely effective), for how “Crazy” functions during the choruses, being bereft of those vocals is costly. Poor vocals are hauled for an excessive, tedious amount of time, and to add onto the disaster, the instrumental further taints the section. Incongruous to the pre-chorus’ instrumental of being graceful and tuneful, the pure opposite occurs; when the chorus arrives, it dissipates into dissonance. The utilized instruments sound horrendous, and overall, an extremely incoherent and chaotic vibe is given.

Due to the choruses failing in both categories of structure and sound, a low score will be given. Below average will be the rating. From what I recall, this may be the first song that I reviewed in which a very low score was given. It is unfortunate, but following protocols, it is the score.    

6. Bridge: 3/10 – If the choruses were not erroneous enough for a section, the bridge, sadly, also contributes. Jihyun is in charge of it.

The bridge remains closely related to the chorus; many issues that arose during the choruses return. For example, in focus of the structure, repetition and a lagging pace, a highly threatening combo if not properly carried out, roam the bridge. Initial moments are 4 identical lines, though there are some minimal deviations between the lines. Towards the later half, the lines do change, but nevertheless, the same format and repetition, overall, exists. Factoring in the slower pace, the exact issue at the chorus appears once more; very similar lines, sung in a lifeless manner, are recycled and repeated for a lengthy duration. On the subject of lifeless singing, firstly, while the instrumental does lose its chaotic nature in comparison to the chorus, it remains equally dull as the singing. Jihyun’s vocals, while they are truthfully solid as seen in their previous song of “Whatcha Doin’ Today,” in their current comeback, they definitely waver. Her singing is as if she were hypnotized; the melody is monotonous, the pitch does not fluctuate, and even the quickened pacing towards the end is miniscule. On the positive side, while her singing style connects to the “Crazy” theme, in a musical standpoint, it offers no beneficial contribution.

Overall, similar to the choruses, the bridge fails in both categories of how it mechanically sounds, and how it is structurally laid out. Below average will make a return.  

7. Conclusion (Chorus): 4/10 – The final chorus is by Hyuna.

An interesting case does exist with the chorus being the conclusion. For one, structurally, with the mindset of a conclusion, it does work, but considering how poor the choruses are, the score will still be negatively impacted. On topic with the strength of the conclusion, with the chorus being reused, a final impression is, with pure, undeniable certainty, left with listeners; the “Like you’re crazy” line will remain lingering. Furthermore, the overall theme of “Crazy” is reiterated once more, and in that regard, more contribution towards leaving remnants of the song. Now, while the chorus serves well in the role of a conclusion, it is still the chorus, and as a result, a mediocre section. On the sole basis of it being the chorus and how weak the section is, the conclusion indirectly suffers.

Perhaps if the final chorus had some positive variations from the rest, a higher score would be possible. For now, however, slightly below average will be the score.

– Line Distribution: 5/10 – With 5 members in 4Minute, a high score should be automatically earned. Though I honestly forgot how their previous song held in terms of the distribution, I have high expectations.

For 4Minute’s leader, Jihyun’s moment includes solely the bridge. Though opinions regarding it will vary, it is unequivocal that it is the only section she handled. This may prove to be an issue depending on the rest of the members, but considering it is solely one section, concerns do arise.

Gayoon’s spotlight exists in the 2 pre-choruses. With the current trend of every member possessing her own section (chorus, verse, etc.), this may end up working perfectly. As of now, no issues.

Jiyoon’s distribution may be concerning; she is responsible for some of the introduction, bits of the first and final chorus and the main body of the second chorus, and lastly, her own rap section. In total, 5 sections are covered, though realistically, it comes down to 3 as practically only 1 chorus was covered. Numerically, it is slightly higher than Jihyun’s and Gayoon’s, and considering she handled the introduction, chorus, and rap, she had more variety than the prior two members. As a result, slightly dominating may the rating, though it depends on the following members.

In Hyuna’s case, it appears to be exceptionally close to Jiyoon’s; the first half of the introduction, a rap, and 2 choruses with bits in another are her share. Totaling up the number, she has 5 sections, like Jiyoon, but considering one chorus is negligible, the final is about 4. Unfortunately, a disparity is seen, and coincidentally, chronologically as well (1, 2, 3, 4 sections is the current members’ order). This will be considered slightly excessive unless if Sohyun modifies the trend.

The youngest lady in 4Minute, Sohyun, covers solely the two verses. Likewise with Gayoon, she possesses 2 sections. Now that every member is disclosed with their number, a proper gauge can be made, and sadly, Sohyun is lacking slightly.

Jihyun significantly lacks as she holds solely 1, and Gayoon and Sohyun follow closely with only 2 sections. Jiyoon and Hyuna are slightly dominating, both with 3 and 4 respectively. As a result, the score will be lowered. Although it is understandable on why the distributions are in this fashion (based on group roles; every members’ section correlates to their singing position, such as rapping, main vocalist, or support vocalist), the grading will still follow through unbiasedly. At the very least, it is admirable that every member does possess their own section label, such as Jihyun with the bridge, Gayoon with all the pre-choruses, but due to the quantity disparity, the score will be held as average.

– Instrumental: 4/10 – The soundtrack for “Crazy” has potential, but due to how certain sections play out, the soundtrack does become affected. Specifically, negatively. Positive aspects are mainly the connections between vocals and instrumental; every section had a proper instrumental, regardless of whether it sounded pleasant on a mechanical level. Examples are blatant at the rapping sections, pre-choruses, and even choruses. During the chorus, for example, the vocals are synced up to in both style and the bolder approach. For the pre-choruses, Gayoon’s graceful singing is reflected with a soundtrack that, like the singing, is equally light and melodic. In terms of where the instrumental falls short, the choruses drain its potential. Every other section, such as the rapping sections, verse, and even introduction, had a soundtrack that was relatively appealing; it was either melodic and suiting to vocals, or more prominent via providing a heavy bassline and beats. When the choruses arrive, all the mechanically pleasing aspects disappear. The used sounds are chaotic, annoying, and though it suits the theme of “Crazy,” it does not quite correlate to the choruses’ vocals, even if the singing, or lack thereof, is poorer.  

Below average will be the score. The choruses, and in fact, even the bridge, are sections that degrade the song in multiple ways. In the instance of the instrumental, it is negatively impacted.

– Meaning: 3/10 – In truth, with the title of “Crazy” and the style of the song, I am expecting very minimal meaning. However, in a more optimistic setting, the meaning behind “Crazy” could be that someone went “crazy” after an incident related to love, be it separating or beginning it. To end the speculations, these lyrics will, hopefully, provide an interesting story. As always, the Korean-to-English translated lyrics are not 100% accurate, but the general idea should stay:

Yeah, I’m the female monster
You know that
Everybody, let’s get crazy right now
Le’ go

People around me call me crazy
You’re looking at me and calling me crazy too
I understand, I think I’m a bit crazy too
I dance to the rhythm
like I’m crazy

Once I go somewhere, people go crazy here and there
The deeper the night gets, we all get crazy
The answer is already there, you’re just okay
Just like that, you and me, go crazy

Don’t make yourself lonely anymore
Find your hidden self
in the world before you tonight
Go crazy, scream, enjoy it
The night is passing
so everyone jump and shake it

Look at me and go crazy
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Follow me
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Everyone go crazy
Like you’re crazy, yeah, like you’re crazy
Like you’re a bit crazier
Like you’re crazy
Like you’re crazy, like you’re already crazy
Like you’re crazy for me right now,
everyone, everyone, go crazy

I’m the crazy girl around here like gossip girl
If you can’t believe me, call me,
hey, call my boyfriend
You can’t come up to my class, I go crazy wherever I go
New York, Paris, Milano, Tokyo, London

Once I decide, people go crazy here and there
When this body passes, everyone goes crazy
The answer is already there, you’re just okay
Just like that, you and me, go crazy

Don’t make yourself lonely anymore
Find your hidden self
in the world before you tonight
Go crazy, scream, enjoy it
The night is passing
so everyone jump and shake it

Look at me and go crazy
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Follow me
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Everyone go crazy
Like you’re crazy, yeah, like you’re crazy
Like you’re a bit crazier
Like you’re crazy
Like you’re crazy, like you’re already crazy
Like you’re crazy for me right now,
everyone, everyone, go crazy

You’re crazy for me, just trust me
Go crazy for me
Trust yourself to me, just trust me
Trust yourself to me
Don’t ask anything and play with me
Just follow me for today
Just follow me for today and pretend to be crazy

Look at me and go crazy
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Follow me
(C.R.A.Z.Y) Everyone go crazy
Like you’re crazy, yeah, like you’re crazy
Like you’re a bit crazier
Like you’re crazy
Like you’re crazy, like you’re already crazy
Like you’re crazy for me right now,
everyone, everyone, go crazy

Speechless as I may be, the more pessimistic view comes to life. “Crazy” depicts a “crazy girl” (though “crazy lady” if we want to be nitpicky) who is, absurdly, simply encouraging others to go “crazy.” The main character seems to be “[called]…crazy,” though it is seemingly moreover a non-literal label. She appears to instill craziness into others as she encourages others to “go crazy, scream, enjoy it.” In truth, I do not comprehend the lyrics. A “crazy” lady is encouraging others to “follow [her]” with being so, and what being crazy might symbolize could be partying, living life in a positive, stress-free manner, and more. Nevertheless, in terms of rating the lyrics, considering the lack of details, confusing points, and practically a lack of a story, a lower score will have to be given. Below average will unfortunately hold. “Crazy” does, on the positive side, live up to its name in terms of the lyrics’ blatant meaning.

In terms of the “Critical Corner,” although the lyrics are, in truth, worthless in terms of analyzing it from a standard musical perspective, I do find some more deeper implications when viewing it outside of such. Tying back my huge digression earlier at the very beginning of this review, it can be seen on why this song is well received by females. The lyrics, though blatantly are meaningless, are actually rather empowering for females. “Crazy” does not necessarily mean insanity, from a literal or non-literal perspective, but rather, it could potentially address what females could indeed be labeled should they step outside androcentric societies’ boundaries. Though a more common term is one I absolutely refuse to use, I encourage readers to ponder a moment about the following scenario: A lady is highly confident, and it is to the degree in which she is willing to label herself a “female monster.” However, rather than being a monster in terms of creatures and beasts, she is simply a monster with a talent, such as dancing; after all, perhaps the lady “[dances] to the rhythm like [she’s] crazy.” Now, with her level of confidence and talent, some “people around [her] call[ her] crazy,” or for a more connecting label, perhaps the word that females are often labeled as if they are perceived as rude. Despite these remarks, however, the “female monster” lady decides to ignore them, and in fact, encourages others to do so as well; “don’t make yourself lonely anymore” might not signify relationships, but rather, the emotion itself. If a person’s life is filled with constant negative remarks, loneliness does indeed take place, and with the lady combating that, she is encouraging others to ignore those comments. Anyhow, overall, with a more critical perspective to the lyrics, the message could be more than the musical interpretation that it is simply nothing. A more in-depth glance could showcase that the lyrics are indeed encouraging females (and males) to ignore the people and even society that are against them, and that despite all the negativity, continuing to keep going “crazy,” whether that is in the form of a job, a hobby, a talent, or whatever, should occur. Now unfortunately, even though this interpretation is vastly more meaningful than the earlier, to be fair and consistent with my reviews, the grade for the Meaning is based on the more standard, musical and blatant layer. Nevertheless, I encourage readers to take their own approach to the lyrics.

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Choreography Score: 6/10 – In terms of the choreography for “Crazy,” with most dances breaking down into syncing and key points, in this song’s case, the latter is where it remains lacking while the prior flourishes. Firstly, in terms of the syncing, despite the weaker audio of “Crazy,” the syncing between the song and movements are incredibly accurate and precise. Beats are matched up with snaps and similar maneuvers, and for moments that are more melody-based, the flow from the song is reflected by actual flowing movements. The chorus at the start, for example, has hand motions to reflect the section’s overall flow at the beginning. Switching to the weaker component of the dance, the syncing may be accurate, but for what is executed as a dance move is not as solid. Many key points are weak, and in many, if not all sections, they are purely average in terms of used dance moves.

Due to the unique split of extremely methodical syncing versus average key points, the choreography will hold as slightly above average. While syncing is a major component, if the dance itself is not appealing, no amount of syncing can utterly redeem it. Nevertheless, the key points were not necessarily bad, and with solid syncing, the choreography holds decently.   

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Overall Score: 6/10 (5.5/10 raw score) – With averaging out 5 and 6 and rounding up, 6 will be the Overall Score. That said, 4Minute’s recent comeback of “Crazy” finishes with a 6, and that indicates slightly above average. Personally, while I do adore the 5 ladies, and in fact, I have finally recently finished the very last episode to Hyuna’s reality show of “Hyuna’s Free Month” (and no, I did not cry, though admittedly I slightly teared up when Hyuna did and even when she did cry, I only teared up decently more), their recent comeback is not too solid in terms of the song itself. As a concept, I am in full support, and additionally, I hope that 4Minute continues it. However, even with this concept, in the future, I hope for a more solid song. But, of course, feel free to disagree with my current take on “Crazy.” In many ways, I hope readers do; a review is simply an author’s perspective to whatever they are reviewing, and thus, it is not a strict, unmalleable and objective fact.

As I always say, thank you very much for reading. I have been slacking a decent amount, but with work coming in gradually yet surely, I have even less time for reviewing songs. Nevertheless, I will always invest time for readers, and in this review’s case, I am running past my sleep in order to finish it for March. For this month, due to upcoming album reviews, hitting at least the 5 review mark should be plausible, and as stated in my February 2015 reflection, I should have a lot more free time later in the month. Anyhow, thank you very much for reading this review. Regardless of agreeing or disagreeing or wanting to harm my physical being for my ratings, I hope it instills some thoughts about 4Minute’s song (and the other mentioned subjects brought up).

For upcoming reviews, with a new month beginning, I have a very popular solo as my next one, and after that, two album reviews. Now after that, a few songs are in mind, and after checking some K-Pop related news, it appears that many groups, especially the less popular ones, are making comebacks during March. Due to that, I will attempt to cover a few.

With this being the end, thank you once more. Although “people around me call me crazy,” I hope “you’re looking at me and” not “calling me crazy too.” However, “I understand, I think I’m a bit crazy too,” and while I may not “dance to the rhythm like I’m crazy,” at least I can claim I write like I’m crazy. Now unfortunately, this “crazy” might indeed be reckless, incoherent writing, but ignoring that and with a mindset of improving, I am not worried. Stay tuned for an upcoming review on Amber’s recent solo of “Shake That Brass.” Like this review, it should prove to be insightful. Keep checking back for it.