AOA – “Like a Cat” Review

AOA – Like a Cat (Live Performance)

AOA – Like a Cat (Official Live Performance)

AOA (Ace of Angels) – Like a Cat

Reviewed on November 22, 2014

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Personal Message: I am exceptionally delayed with releasing reviews. As of right now, I am drowning with lots of work, and with due dates being threateningly close, I’m not prioritizing reviews. Nevertheless, I am still attempting to work on this review as much as possible per day. And, since I believe in honesty, I have been slacking slightly in both work and reviews; videos have been draining a lot of time. But, considering how AOA has been the most hilarious group (so far in my experience) to go on “Weekly Idol,” I believe the time lost is somewhat understandable. Furthermore, I have been pumping extra time into practicing for my E-Sports team. Performance-wise, I’ve been slacking so I am trying to correct that.

Anyhow, as readers may have predicted, I am finally reviewing AOA; specifically, “Like a Cat.” This song definitely poses as a serious contestor to T-ARA’s “Roly Poly” for what I would consider the “catchiest song.” Before anything else is said, to address the link, it is a live performance but, knowing FNC Entertainment’s trend (AOA’s label company), their official dance practice video should be released as well. Unlike a vast majority of other K-Pop labels, their company actually takes the time to upload multiple perspectives of AOA’s choreography; versions of eye contact, full view, and even mirrored have all been uploaded for their previous songs (or at least from what I browsed through). For a better view of the choreography, search up their official one. As of the time I am typing this sentence, their company has yet to upload it, but I am confident in their release of it in the future. That also reminds me, an acoustic version could potentially be released as well. Those versions are extremely beautiful and graceful.  "Short Hair" Acoustic Version is one I cannot recommend enough; in fact, I will link it: AOA – “Short Hair” Acoustic Version (I’m a huge ballad fan as readers may know).

Now to add even more delay before the actual review (although for those who can’t stand my tangents, feel free to just skip this section), I will give my opinion on AOA as a whole. I am still personally familiarizing myself with these ladies, but nevertheless, I have found them to be very captivating and solid. To begin, I will focus on their personality side. All of the members have definitely won my heart via interviews, going on shows, and such.

For those curious on a specific lady of AOA that has captured my attention, Choa has proven to be very charming. While her exquisite hair style and glistening eyeliner and eyeshadow hold as infatuating, her attitude makes her even more beautiful. She constantly strives to improve her skills as a singer and dancer. Her wish is to become a popular singer one day, and I have complete confidence in that outcome (and arguably, that has already come true). Another aspect that I found really admirable was her background; her parents had no intentions of allowing her to pursue a career in the entertainment business (realistically, most parents would be against that). Nevertheless, she yearned to be a singer and pursued it despite her parents’ desires. After multiple audition attempts, she made it. Passion is a powerful drive; anyone is capable of accomplishing anything through following it. Anyhow, Choa has proven to be a very remarkable, inspiring lady. Besides, if not for anything else, at least her laugh is very jocular and sweet. Now, if only she was as “hip” as her younger members. Then again, keeping up with the current pop-culture of slang and whatnot is quite difficult. Even without being 24 years old like her, I tend to be out of the loop for everything (and likewise in my own team, I end up being the laughable one for being oblivious; even more embarrassing is that I’m the second youngest).

This also brings me to another point: age. AOA is, so far in my experience, the youngest group I know of; their average age is 21 (I think). It’s also quite interesting that Jimin, their leader, is not the oldest despite holding that position (ironic that I am the one saying that). But, of course, my vision of a leader is heavily distorted by stereotypes and such; when it comes to the leader role, I envision the person to be the oldest, and additionally, I would expect her to come off with a serious, upholding demeanor. Although Jimin falls short on being the oldest and having a solemn attitude, she still showcases excellent responsibility and care towards her members. And actually looking over this section, I really don’t know how this relates to anything. I wanted to start a conversation on K-Pop idols’ ages and how, for a lack of a better word/phrase, they are “bereft of a ‘normal’, youthful life.” After all, it is intriguing to know that the ladies possess no cell phones, and through the variety show “Weekly Idol,” recently got gifted with a TV. FNC Entertainment may be the one responsible for this, but obviously, it is unclear. And actually, it is another subject that I find the lack of those electronics “intriguing” (I am guiltily poisoned with the idea of electronics and such as “normal”). Time to get back on track; this is perhaps the most random, unrelated Personal Message section I’ve ever wrote for my reviews.

In terms of what readers typically come here for, I will now address AOA from a K-Pop/musical standpoint. The very first song I heard from them was “Confused,” and unfortunately, I found that song to be on the weaker spectrum. Eventually, they continued to rise in popularity, and with their release of “Short Hair,” I finally paid more attention. Fast forward further, their current comeback of “Like a Cat” solidified their position on my personal list of groups to remain updated with.

Something I find respectable and enlightening is the fact that AOA has kept their original style throughout their career. Whether it’s their sexy-themed concepts or their distinctive way of singing and song producers following their trend, it has all remained identical. There was no sudden switch that left people clutching at their aching hearts (I’m obviously in no way referring to Hello Venus’ “Sticky Sticky”; I’m also in no way self-promoting the previous review I wrote on that song). While arguably there was a change in terms of switching from an actual band to the standard dance/singing groups, I will exclude that. The final point on why I find this impressive is due to their growth in popularity. From my personal experience, most of the groups that have made it to the higher tiers did, at one point, make a sudden change or, in a lot of cases, constantly go through different concepts and style to keep a high appeal (T-ARA is perhaps the prime example; they have done multiple, varying concepts to gain the public’s love). In Ace of Angels’/AOA’s case, despite retaining the same mature concepts, they are still growing. Changing to please current trends never occurred. Furthermore, witnessing a group that can be considered “underdogs” work their way to the top is satisfying; a sense of pride and proudness derives from that sole idea (and perhaps this is a miniscule tint on what parents might feel when their children grow up).

I have stated way more than enough (I never knew I’d be so loquacious about AOA) . I will personally blame the dark chocolate I consumed during my time of writing, but anyhow, it is time to focus on their comeback of “Like a Cat.” As foreseen, the seven ladies of AOA are returning with a sexy-themed, mature style. This time, however, their main concept/idea is, as Jimin said in their silly dance tutorial, “learning dating skills from a cat.” The lyrics and dance manipulate a cat’s communication and movement in relation to love and flirting.

Anyhow, did the guard-beating diamond-stealing spies of AOA acquire a jackpot jewelry that will captivate ladies and men? The music video claims so, but through this review, let’s find out for sure.

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Song Total Score: 7/10 (6.6/10 raw score) – Average score of the sub-categories

– Vocals: 7/10 – Tossing a quick disclaimer, as always, I recommend listening to the official audio. Listening to the live performance, in the case of wearing headphones, it sounds rather jumbled (live singing/not singing and background playback are not meshing well for this performance). Nevertheless, the quality isn’t too awful.

In light of AOA’s vocals for “Like a Cat,” they are rated on the higher side. AOA does an exceptional job with carrying forth the melody. The flow is catchy, upbeat, and full of altering pitches. In terms of power, while this song was not orientated towards that aspect, the members showed off impactful, lingering lines. Another excellent aspect of these adept singers is how consistent and stable their voices are. Now, in regards to what is not as solid, the post-chorus and (hoping that Jimin won’t whip me like the guards fans won’t decimate me) their leader’s singing/rapping voice hold on the weaker side. The post-chorus showcased a tedious, melodic sound of “Lalalalala,” and while it holds as exceptionally catchy (more in detail later), the vocals disclosed there were not stunning. Before I begin discussing Jimin’s voice, as mentioned elsewhere, I am judging from a musical lens; every voice is unique and beautiful, and in no way am I attempting to bash a specific type of voice. Jimin’s normal speaking voice is very gentle and sweet. With my safety ensured that said, although her rapping is mechanically sound, her higher pitched, nasally voice does contrast every other member’s voice harshly. Her vocals may benefit the introduction, but overall, juxtaposing the other member’s singing to Jimin’s, the disparity stings.

Above average is the score for “Like a Cat.” From what I have observed, AOA as a whole are not the most adept at singing, but they nevertheless possess decent singing skills. Yuna and Choa are their main vocalists (Hyejeong is also worth mentioning), and indeed, they alleviate the vocal load for their other members in this song. Everyone else, although they held their ground, failed to show off utterly mesmerizing vocals.

– Song Structure: 7/10 (7.4/10 raw score)

The song goes in this structure and order:

Introduction, Verse, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Rap, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Post-Chorus, Bridge, Conclusion (Post-Chorus)

1. Introduction: 8/10 – Jimin is their go-to member for initiating songs; “Miniskirt,” “Short Hair,” “Moya,” and now that I recall more of their songs, practically all of them have had Jimin leading it. For “Like a Cat,” there is no exception to the trend; their leader starts it off.

“Like a Cat” begins with a seemingly random and slightly obnoxious horn sound. After that, Jimin arrives with her lines. With her unique nasally and high pitched voice, she tosses out energetic, catchy, and upbeat English phrases (and while pronounciation is not graded, applause for her flawless English; it was so comprehensible that I actually mistakened a Korean line for an English one). The flow of the lines remain very diverse with different durations, lengths, melody, and background vocals. At the very end, Jimin concludes with the signature of “Brave Sound” (their song producer).

While there are a multitude of weaker aspects to the introduction, it still possesses a higher score of an 8; a solid score. Focusing on the strengths of the introduction, variety and energy have to be the biggest factors. By utilizing different structures such as background vocals of “geu eodil bwado” (means “no matter where you look”; this was the line that I personally heard as “I’ll be by the toe” when in reality, it was a Korean line) and “I know,” it generates and establishes the song’s energetic tune in addition to preventing staleness. Every line spoken was individual and not identical to any other part. Jimin exceeded her role; not only was the song’s mood and energy properly prepared, her varying lines provided a proper hook that would bind listeners.

Contrasting the strengths of this section, what does remain lacking would be predominantly Jimin’s voice along with the questionable horn sound. Regarding the very initial seconds of the song, the horn sound was moreover tumultuous than musical; it was loud and could have been potentially evaded. The only benefit that derives from the use of that noise was a cheap and quick method to instantaneously boost the song’s intensity and energy. Although, in the large scheme, that sound is necessary to smoothly begin the song, a different approach would be more desirable. As for Jimin’s voice, as stated earlier, it is not the most pleasing to hear for a song. While it provided forth a lot of energy and fun, it has a slight tint of annoyance and becomes slightly dull.

Overall, the introduction still holds as solid; the cons are miniscule considering how the horn sound was very brief, and solely Jimin’s voice itself comes off as slightly displeasing. Ignoring the lesser issues, however, and a strong introduction holds. The song engaged listeners via fun, upbeat lines. Additionally, the foundation was properly laid out; the song’s pacing, intensity, and style were all given from the start. An 8 is well deserved.

2. Verse: 7/10 – There is only one verse in this song. This format is not completely alien; we have seen this before in other songs that I have reviewed (not sure on specific ones). Anyhow, Seolhyun and Choa handle this section.

Seolhyun is the first one to sing. Her first two lines involve slower pacing to accommodate the developing melody. Certain endings of “…ae” were also exploited to create a lingering tune. Progressing on, her last line quickens in order to transition to Choa. Once Choa begins, her lines follow the same format as her fellow member.

The verse had the role of developing the song. Coming after the introduction which was relatively energetic, it would be too sudden to have the song play out in high-gear; as a result, a slower, methodical approach would be preferred. In this case, that happened; Seolhyun and Choa were simply constructing the song. By having vocals that were on the calmer side, the explosive vocals that occur later became preservered. In terms of the small sound play with the ending sound of “…ae,” it created some extra specialty to prevent the section from becoming dull.

In summary, the verses lie with a score of above average. While the setup was thoughtful and systematic, the vocals were not dazing nor was the instrumental enticing. Nevertheless, in terms of building up the song, this section fulfilled that role.

3. Pre-Chorus: 7/10 – Mina, a very kind-hearted member, handles the first portion of every pre-chorus. Hyejeong does support her; she arrives for the last half of the pre-choruses. Although pre-choruses tend to heavily hype up a song in preparation for the chorus, “Like a Cat” is a song that remains rather mellow. Therefore, the pre-choruses do not necessarily serve that standard role as typically found in a vast majority of songs. Fitting that role or not, the pre-choruses in “Like a Cat” are decent.

Mina starts the section off with an impactful presence. One line is normally sung, but after that, there is a unique chunking flow; lines of “Spotlight-light-light-light” and “Headline-line-line-line” become used. Once Mina finishes, Hyejeong arrives with melodic and semi-powerful vocals and wraps up the section.

Mina’s part augments this section vastly thanks to having the “Spotlight-light-light-light” (I did not intend for a pun) and “Headline-line-line-line” lines (I still hold my claim). Through this flow, it creates a lingering, catchy and tuneful section. In regards to Hyejeong’s part, her vocals were solid; melody and some power went towards it. Besides leaving a solid impression, her lines provided a very smooth transition to the chorus. Her vocals gave a glance for how the chorus’ vocals would be. As a result, the switch from the pre-chorus to the chorus is borderline undetected.

In the end, although the outline is solid, the singing, specifically on Mina’s part, was not spectacular enough to glean a higher score. Nevertheless, a very promising section that will lure in listeners whether it’s due to Mina’s lines or Hyejeong’s melodic vocals.

4. Chorus: 8/10 – Previously mentioned, the transition to the chorus is nearly cloaked; the chorus sounds as if it is simply an extension to the pre-chorus. While that could be possible, to keep sections less complicated, I will label this as the chorus (and overall, it is a chorus). Choa and Yuna, AOA’s strongest singers, cooperate for this section. Knowing the capabilities of these ladies (check out their acoustic cover for evidence), a solid section is anticipated.

Choa sings first. Her lines follow a slower, sliced up flow. Yuna continues with the same style. Reflecting on the vocals, they were, as expected, very solid. Both Yuna and Choa showcased a delightful and very melodic part. On top of that, the instrumental did its part of supporting the section.

Diving deeper, the strength of the chorus lies in the fact of having a strong flow of melody. For example, Choa’s chunked pacing such as with “sappunsappun” allowed catchiness to build. In addition, their vocals went through a diverse range of speed and pitches; some lines were faster while others were slower, and regarding pitches, the ladies were hitting higher notes at certain endings. Additionally, the instrumental amplified the section as a whole by remaining hyped enough to reciprocate the vocals, but at the same time, it remained passive enough to not strip the attention towards the singing.

A solid section. Having their main vocalists singing as a pair allowed for a very adept and fantastic section. The instrumental also gave justice with supporting the members.

5. Post-Chorus: 7/10 – The post-chorus involves all of the members, although Jimin does have solo lines. This section is perhaps the trademark of “Like a Cat”; it is simple yet extremely catchy. Mentioned earlier, this song challenges T-ARA’s “Roly Poly” for what I would consider the “catchiest song.” That is an impressive feat considering how the chorus of “Roly Poly” becomes heavily ingrained in listeners’ heads.

The post-choruses of the song follow the format of chanting “Lalala” (multiple “La”s; exact number will be at the Meaning Score) which is then followed up by Jimin tossing in an English line of “I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly” (opinion on this later as well). This repeats twice.

Firstly, while the structure of the chanting is mediocre considering it is a standard chant, “Like a Cat” manages to unveil a decent section. Being exceptionally catchy is arguably the only, yet promising, asset to the post-choruses; the “La” chanting lingers around. Peering on purely the chanting, unlike a lot of other songs (Girls’ Generation’s “I Got a Boy” for example), the chanting here remains complex despite recycling the same sound tediously. The pacing varies, and likewise, so does the melody. In terms of preventing staleness, Jimin’s lines ensure that; the solo lines break away the homogenous flow of “La” sounds, and therefore, it allows some extra diversity along with a change in structure. 

Even though I usually loathe this type of format (chanting a sound over and over), “Like a Cat” manages to achieve an above average post-chorus score; a 5 at max is normally what I would give, but a 7 will be earned. Despite how many times I’ve listened to this song, the post-chorus still retains its unique chanting and catchiness. I will claim this is even more catchier than T-ARA’s “Roly Poly” ‘s choruses.

6. Rap: 7/10 – Chanmi and Jimin are responsible for the rapping in “Like a Cat.”

Coming right after the post-chorus, Jimin shoots out a few lines. Her lines follow a flow of rapping one line, and towards the end, having a kissing noise play as Jimin takes a short pause. After that, Chanmi arrives with her own rapping line. Once she finishes, Jimin wraps the section up with another line that ends with a “meow.”

Although I complained about Jimin’s voice earlier, it does aid her rapping via making it sound coherent and smooth. The rapping here was decently paced in terms of the song. What remains slightly weaker is the flow itself. Words were not pouring out like water; there were some rigid, rougher spots. On the subject of subtle details, there were plenty added. The kissing noise during Jimin’s pauses not only reflected the lyrics, but additionally, it created a variety from pure rapping. The transition was also smooth since the “meow” was a clear indication of the rap ending.

Overall, above average for a rap. The different details added make it a unique rap. If the flow of words were smoother, an 8 would have been possible. Nevertheless, it remains a charming rap.  

7. Bridge: 7/10 – The chorus duo returns for the bridge; Choa and Yuna deliver this section. High expectations are set for these ladies, so let’s see if they surpass predictions.

Yuna kicks the bridge off with a slower yet impacting line. Her next line slowly deescalates in terms of power, but it still retains the slower and melodic flow. Choa continues where Yuna left off. Her initial line possesses decent power and she adds a small note hold at “arajwo.” Further on, she tosses in a few English words and towards the end, she releases a lighter, impressive high pitched note hold at “bam~.”

While I would not personally mark this bridge as a phenomenal one, it still deserves a lot of highlight. Yuna’s intro to the section created some build-up, and with her slowly bringing her vocal strength down, it allowed a smooth transition for Choa. Once her member takes over, disclosing her adept talent was the focus. Choa’s power and note spectrum was revealed. Her note hold towards the end was also a solid mark on the climactic point of “Like a Cat.”

The structure and format of the bridge is admirable, and of course, the ladies’ vocals are as well. What does remain an issue, however, is it remains very basic; there was nothing to separate this bridge from other ones. The vocals were solid, but nothing was outstanding. Even the instrumental proved to be a background.

Overall, above average. The bridge lacks some extra aspects to push it towards an 8. Note holds that occurred were fine, but the other parts, such as Yuna’s initial singing, were not utterly captivating. Nevertheless, it is still a respectable bridge.

8. Conclusion (Post-Chorus): 8/10 – Finally, the last part of the song. The conclusion does have the post-chorus replaying, but this time, Choa throws in some two-part singing.

With the normal post-chorus playing out, Choa simply adds in some note holds of “Woah~” and tosses in an English phrase of “The pretty girls are here, oh baby come on~” which does end in a solid, powerful note hold. Once the dust settles with the original post-chorus fading, Choa adds a final line of “Come on over boy” which eventually disappears as well.

From the start, I will say this conclusion is solid. Having the post-chorus reused is an excellent way to leave “Like a Cat” ‘s remnants; the catchiness and looping sounds of “Lalala” and such will stay with listeners. In terms of Choa’s two-part singing, it was a strong finish. Her lines showcased power, sweet melody, and high note capabilities. Her part was also the finishing touch; it added the last climactic moment. When it comes to very end, it was a smooth end. No abrupt cuts or extended periods existed; it song calmly faded out.

A solid ending. This conclusion will net a score of 8. It is stunning in regards to both the two-part singing and the alluring post-chorus. “Like a Cat” concludes effectively and efficiently.

– Line Distribution: 6/10 – With a size of 7 members, distribution of lines may be slightly challenging. Nonetheless, it is very plausible to achieve a high score.

Starting with Choa, she appears at the verse, the bridge, and of course, the choruses. To excessively add more, she also performs two-part singing at the conclusion. As many can tell, she had sufficient time; “sufficient” is a questionable term, however, considering that she might have been given too much time. Being too prominent might cause scarcity of lines for other members, but we shall find out.

Next up is Jimin. The leader’s moments involved the introduction, the solo lines during the post-choruses, and lastly, the rap section. No issues exist here. Every section she appeared at was rather influential; the introduction radiates with her presence along with the other sections.

Yuna had no issues, either. Her lines included the choruses, and she had a part in the bridge. While she may seem lacking in comparison to Jimin and Choa, for what a member should be given in this song’s duration, Yuna had the perfect balance; not lacking but not excessive.

Hyejeong’s lines occurred at solely the pre-choruses. Since her lines were on the longer duration, no issues truly stem from this except for a lack of variety. For the most part, no issues.

In Mina’s case, her “Spotlight-light-light-light” (I’m sure people saw that coming) consisted of solely the pre-choruses. Similar to Hyejeong, since her lines were lengthier, she had enough time. Although singing different, additional lines would have been preferred, there is little trouble here.

Seolhyun, unfortunately, does remaining somewhat lacking. She occurred at solely the first and only verse, but unlike Jimin, her lines did not leave any impactful, lingering memories. Due to that, she can be seen as deprived of some singing time. Having one more additional moment elsewhere would have been desired.

Lastly, we the maknae (youngest person) of AOA: Chanmi. If Seolhyun’s lines, or lack thereof, proved to be an issue, then Chanmi is in a rough situation. Essentially, her lines are completely unnecessary, and sadly, it would have been even viable if Jimin simply took her lines. Chanmi occurred at the rap section in which predominantly Jimin was rapping; only two lines were rapped from Chanmi. Similar to an old review of Boyfriend’s “Witch,” the rap section in that song had the same issue; two people rapped, but in reality, only the main rapper was necessary. Anyhow, a horrendous distribution for Chanmi; her lines were not only short, but furthermore, were completely replaceable with Jimin simply taking over.

One additional factor to account for is that all the ladies sing during the post-chorus, but unfortunately, since that section leaned moreover towards chanting than singing, it loses its value of being “lines” in the song.

In the end, 5/7 members had adequate lines, and even then, scrutinizing further would reveal that it is still somewhat imbalanced. Choa comes off as too prominent although biasedly, I can’t complain, and Mina and Hyejeong were slightly lacking. The only member with a near-perfect distribution was Yuna. Overall, disappointing for a share of lines. For the score, considering it was mainly 5/7 members (that equates to roughly 70% of AOA) singing, adding in the vital factors of how Choa slightly overpowered the song and Mina’s and Hyejeong’s semi-lacking lines, a lower score will be given. 6 for slightly above average. Normally, 6-membered groups do fine, so even adding one more person should not prove to be troubling. On the other hand, even 9-membered groups are capable of solid distributions. It is somewhat disappointing to see issues occur here.  

– Instrumental: 7/10 – The instrumental in “Like a Cat” is pleasing; it adds a supportive foundation for the vocals along with other utilities.

Meshing with the vocals was natural; neither parties contrasted the other one harshly. In terms of matching up to the song’s flow, that was followed through. The instrumental was only as energetic as the vocals. A clear example is observing the pre-chorus to the post-chorus: the instrumental steps up a notch to accommodate the singing, but once the post-chorus arrives, it plays out as slightly passive in order to fit the chanting. Individually, the instrumental had a soothing, attractive, and catchy influence. A solid soundtrack by itself.

Overall, above average. It lacks the extra spice to gain a higher rating, but nevertheless, it holds as very suiting towards the vocals, and on its own, it comes off as a catchy soundtrack.

– Meaning: 6/10 – “Like a Cat” is a unique title. I predict lyrics that tell a flirtatious love-story. After all, Jimin did claim that datings skills can be derived from a cat. For an off-topic story/fact, apparently slowly blinking at a cat (or receiving such) is their way of sharing affection. For those wondering if this is true, I will ask a teammate who is obsessed with cats (his cats are truly adorable and irresistible). On topic, through these Korean-to-English translated lyrics, let’s find out the story:

Hey no matter where you go
(No matter where you look)
The pretty girls are AOA
You know (I know) You know (I know)
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly
Brave Sound

You say you’ve never seen a girl like me before
That you had a feeling as soon as you saw me
Said that I especially shined
even among the many people
Your head turns to look at me
Your eyes are filled with me
Seeing you hesitate
to talk to me is so cute

The sunlight shines on me like a
spotlight-light-light-light
Only I am in your head as a
headline-line-line-line
Even when you dream, you’ll see me
Are you worrying? Stop it
Come to me, baby come on

I’ll walk over to you like a cat
Picking a rose,
I’ll give it to you,
I’ll surprise you
I’ll walk over to you like a cat
When you’re asleep,
I will softly hug you,
I’ll surprise you

Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly
Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly

I want to go to you like a cat
Tonight, without anyone knowing
I wanna softly kiss you on your lips
when you’re sound asleep
You and I, on this sweet night,
let’s hold tight to the night
You’re my wolf,
I’m your cute cat

The sunlight shines on me like a
spotlight-light-light-light
Only I am in your head as a
headline-line-line-line
Even when you dream, you’ll see me
Are you worrying? Stop it
Come to me, baby come on

I’ll walk over to you like a cat
Picking a rose,
I’ll give it to you,
I’ll surprise you
I’ll walk over to you like a cat
When you’re asleep,
I will softly hug you,
I’ll surprise you

Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly
Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly

We fly high, hug me tonight
and fly higher
So I can touch
the clouds and the moon
Know how my trembling heart
flies so lightly
Oh talk to me, oh lead me
Oh kiss me baby tonight

Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly
(Come baby, kiss baby)
Lalalalalala Lalalalalala Lalalalalala
(The pretty girls are here, oh baby come on~)
I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly
(Come on over boy)

The lyrics are indeed about a loving and flirting scenario. Although specifically in this case the main character is a “girl” (“lady” is the true word if I want to be really picky), overall, it remains neutral in relation to gender; the main character could be simply described as a “lover.” Focusing on what is depicted, a lady is expressing her wishes about her love-interest. Lavishing her love-interest with flowers, hugs, kisses, and such are the main details. Unlike a lot of other stories that have a shy lover, the character in “Like a Cat” has a confident, slightly arrogant demeanor. She feels that she is “good,” “hot,” “fresh,” and “fly.” There are multiple details and different aspects that showcase how infatuated the lover is, but the amount is minimal considering most ideas are essentially repeated.

Overall, a decent love story. It remains cute and charming, and as a result, a tint of sexiness is also gleaned from that. Slightly above average for the lyrics. Extra details would easily bump it up to a 7, but as of now, a 6 will be the score. Nevertheless, it is a sweeter story; after all, assuming you have no allergies with flowers, who would not love such a gift?

Now for the “nitpicking” in terms of picking out some intriguing parts of the lyrics, I find the post-chorus’ terms slightly strange. And before going any further, this will not affect the score unless if it is exponentially significant. Addressing, “I’m good I’m hot I’m fresh I’m fly,” while it adds a lot of energy and upbeatness for the song, in terms of breaking down the meaning, it holds as very absurd. Perhaps I am pulling the “I-am-Choa-so-I-don’t-know-slang” card, but I find the diction used for that line questionable. As some readers may know by now, the term “hot,” in my personal list, is very basic and not worth utilizing as an adjective towards describing a person’s physical, intelligent, and personality beauty. Unless if temperature is the subject, “hot” can be replaced by a plethora of other meaningful, vastly more significant words. For the other terms, “fresh” and “fly” are equally absurd, but considering how those are slang words that are probably related to “cool” and whatnot, it will be forgiven. I will cut it off here. Although I am positive that other lines are worth breaking apart, for the sake of keeping the review running, I will progress to the next part.    

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Choreography Score: 6/10 – Quick note, as of the time I typed this sentence, FNC Entertainment did release their official dance practice videos (full version, eye contact, and for dancers, a .8x speed video to make it easier to learn). There is one issue, however: Mina is nowhere to be seen. From what I know, she is busy with filming a drama, hence why she is absent. In the end, it turns out the linked performance will be what I recommend just for the purpose of seeing the full group.

Digressing aside, the dance for “Like a Cat” does hold as lacking. Even though I am probably still scarred from Hello Venus’ “Sticky Sticky” dance relieved to see that the dance was not overly sexualized, it does, unfortunately, remain somewhat mediocre. Syncing was shockingly a large issue; the verse is one example of how the music and dance maneuvers were disconnected. During that section, although the motions were emulating the song’s flow and pacing, it was inconsistent and the only clear, unequivocal moves that synced properly were at the very end of Seolhyun and Choa’s singing. Other sections were also guilty of not matching up to the song. The only sections that were flawlessly synced were the post-choruses and rap; for the post-choruses, every beat was related to a “hip” snap, and for the rap, the flow was matched. Paying attention to the key points (repeated movesets), none were too appealing. A vast majority of the choreography focused on emulating a cat’s movement, but that sadly proved to be either poorly synced or simply dull. Even sections without mimicking a cat, such as the post-chorus, were equally loathing.

A choreography does not need to be utterly complex, and in fact, simplicity is sometimes very effective (T-ARA’s “Number 9” is a solid example), but without properly syncing and having unique maneuvers or positions, the simplicity concept completely backfires, such as in this case. Although it hurts to give a lower-end score for a section that heavily impacts the overall rating, I will grade fairly assuming I forget about Choa and give a 6 for slightly above average. “Like a Cat” has a simple choreography that contains potential, but unluckily, AOA does not manage to execute a completely infatuating dance. Nevertheless, there are still some adequate moments despite how poorly synced and unappealing the key points were. Due to that, the score is not hitting the bottom of the scale.

Now, to add a small tangent on the sexual part of the dance: the “hip” snapping part. In all honesty, everyone knows it is a butt-orientated part versus the current label of a “hip” dance. To say the least, it is interesting and I hold multiple positions regarding it. What I can appreciate is how subtle it is in comparison to a lot of other songs (or maybe I am still simply traumatized by my previous review). Although sexual-orientated parts prove to be obstructive at times due to deconstructing maneuvers to very plain, basic motions, in this case, due to proper syncing and the lack of emphasis/exaggeration, that theme was not too hindering. Nevertheless, sexual or not, the post-chorus’ dance was still very stale. On a different topic, regarding AOA’s choreographies in general, while most of them have explicit or implicit sexual concepts, they tend to be properly executed; nothing is grotesque in terms of being vastly inappropriate or overly emphasized. Remaining mature and retaining maneuvers that relate to the music itself is what AOA does well for the realm of sexy-themed choreographies.

Anyways, as stated ages ago, 6 will be the score.    

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Overall Score: 7/10 (6.5/10 raw score) – At the end, AOA’s “Like a Cat” finishes with a 7/10, and that represents above average, and I do agree with that value. If we are being keen towards the raw scores, however, I am slightly concerned that the Song Score did finish with a 6.6; that is threateningly low. The weaker Line Distribution Score and Meaning Score might have been the reasons.

Anyhow, although statistically the song is not too strong, biasedly, I find it a very catchy song. If I were to review this song via “feelings” versus logic like how I used to long ago in the past, I would have given this an 8. Realistically, of course, we can see certain flaws throughout the song, and that it truly is not the best. Nevertheless, it is above average and I still highly recommend AOA. I have been watching a lot of their interviews and whatnot. I will claim they are a rising group, and it is well deserved. These ladies have worked very hard to get to where they currently are at. Lots of respect towards them. That also reminds me, although I did not link the music video, in comparison to a lot of other ones (or once again, I might still be mentally scarred), it is well done with retaining AOA’s usual sexual-themes without going overboard (but nonetheless, it is very sexualized at certain moments). Besides, it is the first music video I saw with a small plot occurring. Anyways, I personally will be keeping track of AOA’s future releases and such. They have won my heart through their humor, wit, intelligence, and very respectable dedication, and they have won my ears with decent songs (although in honesty, most of their songs are “above average” or even just “slightly above average” if I were to review them).

As I always say and do, thank you very much for reading this review. I hope I did the song justice. I considered being hasty and quickly finishing this review, but I went against that and went my usual pacing. Nevertheless, I apologize deeply for not posting anything for 8 days. As I mentioned with an update post, I have been very busy with school work, so I’m allocating more times toward that. I will be making a strong return during Thanksgiving break; I plan to do a song per day during my time off. While I am skeptical on that, please look forward to it. Thanks for your patience and time, I appreciate it so, so much.

In terms of upcoming reviews, for some reason, during periods where I have multiple songs in mind, I end up being very time restricted. Lots of ballad songs are in mind, but there are also a lot of regular K-Pop songs as well. In order to keep things diverse, I will probably review a male group. But, if I may add my personal belief or at least my experience, males already have enough attention; society is male-orientated and dominated enough. And for those who will get defensive, I am not offending males; I am stating that society is simply structured towards males’ perspective. Point is, if my next review does happen to be another female artist, readers should not overreact and claim I am not being “fair” and such.

Now with that said, I have both male and female artists in mind to review. I will probably do a rushed review for one song I consider mediocre, and then return with a more detailed review on another song. In fact, I think I may review a song with a different language other than Korean; Girls’ Generation did release a Japanese ballad a while back, and I will say, it is indescribably beautiful. To go off topic, music holds a very interesting position in relation to culture and whatnot. Despite how Japanese sounds very foreign to me (and note, unlike a vast majority of newbies exposed to songs with different languages, I said “foreign” and not “weird/strange” or, forbid, “wrong”), I can still heavily appreciate the music and vocals. And, uniquely, the emotional vibe is still felt despite having a language barrier. I am sure a lot of K-Pop enthusiasts can relate; even for those who don’t understand Korean at all, let alone the culture and such, it is impossible to deny that some songs do sound amazing despite sounding foreign.

Back on track, I plan to either review Girls’ Generation’s “Divine” (the J-Ballad) or GOT7’s “Girls Girls Girls” (faster review) for my next one. Even then, I have 5 other songs in mind as well. That reminds me, Hyorin from Sistar did make a solo comeback, so I might review her recent ballad. But, keep in mind I am already drowning in work, so look forward to it, but do not put in too much anticipation. Overall, it will remain a surprise for what my next review is. I have an itch to review a ballad song. With winter coming and all, ballads are always soothing.

I have said too much for this review, so I believe this is a proper place to end it. Once again, thank you very much for the wait. I sincerely appreciate your patience, and I will do my best to repay that with a barrage of reviews coming out during my own break. If it was possible, I would be “Picking a rose” and I would “give it to you.” Thanks for reading, stay tuned for future reviews and for other fun posts as well.